2015 Spring Courses

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100 Level Courses

150.001: The Study of Literature

TR 0800-0915
Staff

150.002: The Study of Literature

MW 1700-1815
Michael Noltemeyer, man@unm.edu

This introductory course for non-English majors will draw upon a limited number of diverse literary texts--including poems, short stories, a play, and a novel--in order to prioritize the development of analytical skills ("How do I approach a literary text?") above broad-based knowledge of the canon ("What am I supposed to know about this particular text?"). Students will learn to respond critically to texts with different themes, styles, purposes, and audiences by identifying major elements common to all literary analyses and then articulating those features both orally and in writing. In the process students will not only gain a deeper understanding and appreciation of literature, but also become more effective critical thinkers and communicators, skills that should transfer productively to any discipline. Course requirements include active participation in class discussions, several short response papers, an oral presentation, a midterm, and a final exam.   

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200 Level Courses

211.001: Fundamentals of Screenwriting

M 1530-1800 
Michael Amundsen mtam@unm.edu

220.001: Monster Theory and the Zombie in Popular Culture

MWF 0800-0850
Breanna Griego-Schmitt, mamapeep@unm.edu

The zombie is an important figure in American popular culture. We are fascinated by the living dead, their hunger for human flesh, their mindless group mentality, and the fallout caused by their existence. Yet we should also be aware that the zombie offers more than just a gory depiction of the macabre. Monsters represent a broader commentary on the individual, race relations, survival instincts, natural disasters, scientific progress, capitalism, and the collective social consciousness, among other things. This class will explore monster theory, the historical foundations behind common fears, and the fascination with demons, witches, mutants, and vampires. We will spend a large portion of the semester exploring current issues such as cannibalism, gun control, natural disasters, perspectives on the end of the world, and mental illness. TV shows, movies, music, comics, and advertisements all work together to create a broad base of content knowledge, therefore this course will function as a multimodal learning experience. A multimedia and multimodal approach will improve student progress and retention of the material, and will allow students to actively engage with the outcomes outlined by the English department. We will begin the course by studying Islamic, Jewish, and Christian notions of the demons and the end of the world. Next, we will move through medieval female spirituality, early modern identification of demons and persecution of heretics. We will also evaluate contemporary theories about borderlands and the notion of "the other." The second half of the course will focus on the rhetoric of American popular culture. We will read Pride and Prejudice and Zombies and work closely with the first compendium of the popular series of graphic novels, The Walking Dead. Film plays a large role in constructing the mythos surrounding monsters and zombies, and our class will spend time analyzing motion pictures including George Romero's Night of the Living Dead, Zombieland, and The Walking Dead TV series. The assignments for this course will involve film analyses, a commentary, and rhetorical and literary analyses. The final paper will be an in-depth research paper on a pre-approved subject of their choice.    

220.002: The Legal Imagination

MWF 1000-1050
Christopher Ryan, cpryan@unm.edu

The Legal Imagination is an advanced course in reading and writing.  It is a study of what lawyers and judges do with words.  The focus of the course is law, but it will be useful to any student interested in how language is manipulated and controlled by writers and how language practices come to shape a profession and the professionals operating within that profession.  The title of this class derives from the book The Legal Imagination published in 1973 by James Boyd White.  This text is widely considered to be Professor White's seminal work and one of the founding documents of the law and literature movement.  Readings are derived mostly from literature and the classics and include selections from Plato, Aristotle, Twain, Frost, Hume, Thoreau, Proust, Dickens, E.M. Forster, Chaucer, and others.  We will also examine prominent and well known court cases, legal statutes, and other legal literature including writings from Justices Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. and Benjamin Cardozo.  The writing assignments in the course will primarily ask you to reflect on your own use of language.  The final eight to ten page research paper will ask you to apply the principles learned in class to your own area of academic interest.  No background in law or legal studies is required, but an interest in the field will be useful.  

220.003: The Cultural Hero

MWF 1100-1150
Mark Caughey, mcaughey@unm.edu

This course will explore not only how cultures construct their heroes but also how heroes construct a sense of cultural identity. We will consider both the hero's ancient origins and its transformation over time and across cultures -- from the epic hero to its latter-day counterpart: the superhero. To that end, we will examine such texts as The Epic of GilgameshThe Saga of the Volsungs and Christopher Nolan's Dark Knight trilogy. Along the way, we will develop a framework that will help us understand how some characteristics of the hero remain constant while others arise from specific cultural beliefs and values. Students will hone their writing and research skills through assignments that include reviews, comparative analyses, and multimodal presentations.

220.004: John Steinbeck and the American Social Conscience

MWF 1300-1350
Michael Noltemeyer, man@unm.edu

In awarding John Steinbeck the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1962, the committee commended him for his "realistic and imaginative writing, combining as it does sympathetic humor and keen social perception." Those qualities prompted many reviewers to laud his Grapes of Wrath as a landmark novel in American history; wrote the New York Times: "Good Lord, what a book." Interestingly, those very same qualities led other reviewers to condemn his "preachiness," "as if half his literary inheritance came from the best of Mark Twain"”and the other half from the worst of Cotton Mather." For better or for worse, Steinbeck was a writer motivated by a strong sense of social conscience. This course will examine the myriad ways in which that social conscience manifested itself in Steinbeck's work. We will start with Grapes of Wrath, with regard to which Steinbeck once noted, "I want to put a tag of shame on the greedy bastards responsible for this [Great Depression]." By reading the book and then comparing it to various subsequent adaptations in film, television, and popular music, we will attempt to evaluate just how successful he was in doing so. In the second half of the course, we will branch out by examining the ways in which his social concerns manifested themselves in the rest of his oeuvre, reading an eclectic assortment of his short stories, essays, journalism (especially the war correspondence from both WWII and the Vietnam War), and perhaps even a screenplay. We will also of course produce writing assignments in several genres along the way. By the end of the semester, we will attempt not only to reevaluate Steinbeck's complex literary le gacy, but also to wrestle with the larger questions of social conscience, still relevant today, that so preoccupied him throughout his career. Finally, we will apply that newfound understanding to address current issues of social import beyond the classroom.    

220.005: The Legal Imagination

MWF 1200-1250 
Christopher Ryan, cpryan@unm.edu

The Legal Imagination is an advanced course in reading and writing.  It is a study of what lawyers and judges do with words.  The focus of the course is law, but it will be useful to any student interested in how language is manipulated and controlled by writers and how language practices come to shape a profession and the professionals operating within that profession.  The title of this class derives from the book The Legal Imagination published in 1973 by James Boyd White.  This text is widely considered to be Professor White's seminal work and one of the founding documents of the law and literature movement.  Readings are derived mostly from literature and the classics and include selections from Plato, Aristotle, Twain, Frost, Hume, Thoreau, Proust, Dickens, E.M. Forster, Chaucer, and others.  We will also examine prominent and well known court cases, legal statutes, and other legal literature including writings from Justices Oliver Wendell Holmes, Jr. and Benjamin Cardozo.  The writing assignments in the course will primarily ask you to reflect on your own use of language.  The final eight to ten page research paper will ask you to apply the principles learned in class to your own area of academic interest.  No background in law or legal studies is required, but an interest in the field will be useful.  

220.006: The Jazz Age: Rhetoric of the Roaring Twenties

MWF 1600-1650
Katherine Alexander, kalex@unm.edu

Following The Great War (WWI), women threw away their corsets, shortened their hemlines, and bobbed their hair.  Undaunted by Prohibition, many became flappers as they joined men in the world of bathtub gin and speakeasies. The twenties were also a time when "Great Migration" began.  Eventually six million African Americans would leave the rural South and move to the urban areas of the North.  With them came their music--Jazz and the Blues.  All of these major upheavals greatly changed America of the 1920s, otherwise known as "The Jazz Age."  Offering a multimodal approach rather than the traditional lecture approach, this English 220 course offers an opportunity for students to recapture the rhetoric of one of the most exciting times in America. Therefore, assignments and activities for students will include varied formats and genres. The first unit will feature two iconic figures of "The Jazz Age":  F. Scott and Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald.   Students will read The Great Gatsby and Save Me the Waltz. The most recent Gatsby film starring Leonardo DiCaprio will be shown in class. Excerpts from the earlier Robert Redford film will provide a comparative look at the subject matter.   The second unit will feature some of the poetry of Langston Hughes, one of the most important thinkers and writers of "The Harlem Renaissance." Supplementing Hughes' poetry will be the biographies and music of Louis Armstrong, who came North during "The Great Migration," and Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington. The role of the woman musician in the early development of the Blues and Jazz is well represented by Bessie Smith, "The Empress of the Blues." Students will have the opportunity to view performances of these musicians in film clips.  Ernest Hemingway will provide the focus for the third unit. Students will read A Farewell to Arms and The Sun Also Rises. The first selection offers Hemingway's perspective on The Great War where he was an ambulance driver. The disillusionment following the war is well portrayed in The Sun Also Rises. Students will have the opportunity to view film productions of both works in class. The poetry of Gertrude Stein will supplement Hemingway's novels.  If you are interested in the frenetic rhetoric of the Roaring Twenties, this is the class for you! 

220.007: The Jazz Age: The Rhetoric of the Roaring Twenties

MWF 1300-1350
Katherine Alexander, kalex@unm.edu

Following The Great War (WWI), women threw away their corsets, shortened their hemlines, and bobbed their hair.  Undaunted by Prohibition, many became flappers as they joined men in the world of bathtub gin and speakeasies. The twenties were also a time when "Great Migration" began.  Eventually six million African Americans would leave the rural South and move to the urban areas of the North.  With them came their music--Jazz and the Blues.  All of these major upheavals greatly changed America of the 1920s, otherwise known as "The Jazz Age."  Offering a multimodal approach rather than the traditional lecture approach, this English 220 course offers an opportunity for students to recapture the rhetoric of one of the most exciting times in America. Therefore, assignments and activities for students will include varied formats and genres. The first unit will feature two iconic figures of "The Jazz Age":  F. Scott and Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald.   Students will read The Great Gatsby and Save Me the Waltz. The most recent Gatsby film starring Leonardo DiCaprio will be shown in class. Excerpts from the earlier Robert Redford film will provide a comparative look at the subject matter.   The second unit will feature some of the poetry of Langston Hughes, one of the most important thinkers and writers of "The Harlem Renaissance." Supplementing Hughes' poetry will be the biographies and music of Louis Armstrong, who came North during "The Great Migration," and Edward Kennedy "Duke" Ellington. The role of the woman musician in the early development of the Blues and Jazz is well represented by Bessie Smith, "The Empress of the Blues." Students will have the opportunity to view performances of these musicians in film clips.  Ernest Hemingway will provide the focus for the third unit. Students will read A Farewell to Arms and The Sun Also Rises. The first selection offers Hemingway's perspective on The Great War where he was an ambulance driver. The disillusionment following the war is well portrayed in The Sun Also Rises. Students will have the opportunity to view film productions of both works in class. The poetry of Gertrude Stein will supplement Hemingway's novels.  If you are interested in the frenetic rhetoric of the Roaring Twenties, this is the class for you!        

220.008: Gothic Literature: The Uncanny and Grotesque

TR 1700-1815
Megan Malcom-Morgan, megan90@unm.edu

Gothic Literature: The Uncanny and Grotesque What is Gothic Literature? Gothic is a genre that is at once cohesive and divisive, a unification of elements and a paradox. It incorporates themes of eternal conflict and importance to the human condition - relationships, gender, patriarchy, nostalgia, and the sublime. Most importantly, it looks away from the present to the past and from what is obvious and scientific towards an inner world that is at once liberating and imprisoning, and forces the reader to engage it on its own terms, and not those of social and cultural conditioning. The sublime, uncanny and grotesque are important elements of the gothic and create a dialogue for the social construct of race, gender, sexuality, and "monsters" in literature.  This course will introduce students to gothic literature beginning with nineteenth century European and American literary concepts to the more contemporary interpretations.  Readings will include: works by Sigmund Freud; Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre; Emily Bronte Wuthering Heights; Oscar Wilde The Picture of Dorian Gray; Mary Shelley Frankenstein; Robert Louis Stevenson The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Henry James The Turn of the Screw; works by Edmund Burke, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Washington Irving, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, Herman Melville, Charles Chesnutt, Kate Chopin, and various other author.   

220.009: Times They are A-changin': Writing the 1960's

TR 0800-0915
Robert Christensen

The 1960's was the era of Woodstock, Vietnam, global student protests, the Civil Rights movement, and countless other political and cultural upheavals. In this class we'll discuss the cultural and social movements associated with the global 1960's, as well as the political events they corresponded with. We'll analyze the music of Bob Dylan and Jimi Hendrix, debate who "won" the Cuban Missile Crisis, discuss drug culture, and much more. We'll also focus on understanding the multiple perspectives that people then and now have taken on the events of the decade, as the period's complicated legacy is regularly exhumed and beaten around or put on a pedestal by various groups today.  Assignments for this class will include a comparative primary source analysis on pieces from different perspectives, a group presentation on one element of the surprising number of student protests that took place in 1968 all around the world, and a final research project where you'll explore what the 1960's means for us today. Readings will be mainly drawn from a source anthology, but will also be supplemented by video and audio recordings that we will analyze together in class. Because of our broad spectrum of readings we'll have the opportunity to take a variety of disciplinary perspectives on our material, including history, comparative literature, anthropology, and political science.  "There's a battle outside ragin', It'll soon shake your windows, And rattle your walls, For the times they are a-changin'."   

220.010: Investigating (with) Nonfiction

TR 1530-1645 
Ben Dolan, bdolan@unm.edu

In this section of ENGL 220, we'll be focused on reading and producing contemporary essay-length nonfiction. Though this isn't a journalism class, many of the pieces we'll be reading are classified as "long-form" journalism. All of these pieces use interviewing, shadowing, and observation as primary sources of research. We'll be reading pieces published within the last couple years in magazines like Harper's, GQ, Outside, The New York Times Magazine, and Texas Monthly that cover topics from immortal jellyfish to stalkers to Gary Johnson's failed run for the Presidency to bullying to wrongful imprisonment. We'll also read several fascinating books: Truman Capote's In Cold Blood (1966), James Galvin's The Meadow (1993), Dave Cullen's Colu mbine (2009), and Mary Roach's Gulp (2014).  This class is intended to help you get experience in the type of research that takes place away from your computer; it is especially for those who like going out and writing about other people, their lives, and the issues that concern them. The class is focused on research, though secondary research (library/database research) will only be a small part of the work we'll do. For the most part, we'll be "investigating" the world through active, exciting research: interviewing, shadowing, observing and composing engaging articles on topics of your choice.

220.011: Western Film & Literature

TR 1230-1345
Matthew Maruyama, reidmaruyama@gmail.com

This class will focus on five primary texts: "Blood Meridian" by Cormac McCarthy, "Butcher's Crossing" by John Williams, "Warlock" by Oakley Hall, "Angels" by Denis Johnson, and "Son of a Gun" by Justin St. Germain. Discussion will be centered on how these five novels use the genre of the Western in order to debunk and expose the myths of the Wild West and how the violence that accompanied Westward Expansion in the 1800s has affected our contemporary politics and the way in which we've shaped an American identity. We will also watch some of the early films of John Wayne and Gary Cooper and will follow the progression of the genre through to the Spaghetti Westerns and to Clint Eastwood's masterpiece, "Unforgiven." Through this progr ession, we will discuss how the Western genre has pushed into the intellectual realm, where psychological depth and complexity has replaced the simplicity of heroism.  

220.012: Revising Milton: The Legacy of Milton in the Popular Imagination

TR 0930-1045
Karra Shimabukuro, kshimabukuro@unm.edu

Are you a fan of the devil in horror films like Prophecy, Legion, Constantine? Have you ever wondered where the popular culture ideal of a war in heaven, and the concept of good and bad angels came from? Where do shows like Supernatural get their mythology from? What literary and popular references are seen in Neil Gaiman's Sandman series? Why did Philip Pullman write an entire young adult series that references a 300 year old epic poem? Each of these popular culture texts owes a debt to John Milton's Paradise Lost. Paradise Lost created a new religious mythology that in many ways has supplanted traditional Judeo-Christian religious beliefs. It is Milton's "new" religious narrative that has been forwar ded through literary texts and specifically through popular culture. William Blake once stated that people were guilty of knowing their Milton better than their Bible. This course will focus on how Paradise Lost, and the mythology it presents has been forwarded in art, movies, television, comics, and literary texts. This course is particularly aimed at Fine Arts majors (art, art history, theatre and dance, cinematic arts, film and digital media). We begin the course by examining the long history Paradise Lost has with art and illustrations, move onto literary allusions, then television and movie references, ending the course with an examination of these references in comics. We have three major assignments that we'll complete in this course.

220.021: Intro to Legal Writing

Online
Soha Turfler, turflers@unm.edu

The specific theme selected for this section of English 220 is "Introduction to Legal Writing." This course is designed as an introduction to legal reasoning and writing for undergraduate students who are considering entering law school or who want to learn "how to think (and argue!) like a lawyer." But even though we will study and practice the strategies which lawyers use in analyzing legal cases and preparing claims for trial, the reasoning and argumentation skills developed through this class will have application far beyond the courtroom. Throughout the semester, we will explore how lawyers and judges use various rhetorical devices to create persuasive arguments. We will practice reading and interpreting legal texts and will conduct research into narrowly defined legal questions. We will argue like lawyers about various real and fictitious lawsuits. And, at the end of the semester, we will participate in a multimodal moot court exercise.

220.022: Expository Writing

Online
Maya Alapin, maya.alapin@gmail.com

Education is a central concern of virtually every single undergraduate, yet students today are rarely asked to consider the roots of the education they are pursuing, to question it or to understand it theoretically. This course offers students an opportunity to use writing and multimedia to explore their own education, American education, and (optionally), education in the developing world. Because students enrolled in this course unexceptionally have experiences in and with some educational system, they are able to draw on their own experiences, opinions and reactions when responding to online discussions and in responses to their peers. This makes for a fun, interactive online course that invites students into freewrites, peer feedback and which engages students in multimedia projects that they can tailor to their interests. Readings for the course include manageably-sized excerpts from the most well-known texts on education throughout Western history including Plato, Rousseau, Dewey, Montessori, and Alfred North Whitehead. We also read shorter excerpts, hear speeches, watch videos from "teachers" of other fields in order to explore a variety of approaches to education. These include Gandhi, Steve Jobs, Bill Clinton and David Foster Wallace. The course also includes media made by amateurs, like a Venezuelan girl trying to communicate the plight of her country in 2014, when the Internet was cut off from civilians. All these readings are available on the Learn site. Students in this course engage with multimedia work. Though the first project of the course is a traditional essay, the first project also asks that students illustrate their interpretations usingm usic, video, Prezis, websites, voice-overs, fine art pieces or another medium of their choice. Similarly the final term project allows students to compose an educational manifesto in the form of a fully integrated multimedia project. The course includes a bi-weekly Weebly lab to enable all coursework to be published on a personal student website. Though the goal is to engage with many mediums, students do not need any prior knowledge in technology to take this class. TEXTS REQUIRED: They Say, I Say. Also available online inside the course.

 **Students must have access to the Internet and to a reliable computer/tablet. You cannot take this course on a mobile phone.

220.023: Music and Message: The Social, Cultural and Political Implications of American Popular Music

Online
Murdock Omooney, omooney@unm.edu

Music is everywhere in the modern environment, and yet how much thought do we give to the messages in music? What social or political sentiment is the artist conveying through their music? Do musicians respond to, or create, social, political and cultural movements? What social theories can we see playing out in popular music? Does American popular music influence international opinions of America? If so, how?  These are some of the questions we will attempt to answer in this Online English 220 expository composition course. Through research, comparative analysis and application of basic social theories, such as Social Constructivism and Critical Race Theory, we will attempt to understand the greater social, political and cultural contexts surrounding American popular music. If you love music, composition, social and cultural studies, then this class is for you.

220.031: Writing the Transgressive Female Experience

TR 1100-1215
Dene Shelton, sheltond@unm.edu

In this course, students will be asked to share a personal narrative, to center that narrative within the course texts, and to triangulate by presenting "the personal is political" relationship to the class via multi-media format. The integration of creative work with informed research is highly encouraged, as students will utilize autoethnography as method and ficto-critical analysis to make connections to prevailing sociopolitical concerns. As preparation for the three major assignments, students will read a small but comprehensive sampling of selected memoir and rarely, outsider fiction works, chosen from authors such as Michelle Tea, Marjane Satrapi, Diane DiMassa, Dorothy Allison, Abigail Thomas, Kathryn Harrison, Julia Alvarez, Jamaica Kincaid, bell hooks, Maya Angelou, Mary Karr, and Lois Price. Please feel free to google these authors, and note that reading material may change. 

220.032: Expository Writing: Exploding the Essay

TR 1400-1515
Sarah Sheesley, sshees12@unm.edu

What does a video essay have in common with Montaigne and Thoreau? Why are personal essays so popular? Is there a difference between fact and truth? How do you use research in narrative nonfiction? It's time to tear up your college application essay and explore a range of forms and technologies to understand and produce compelling, relevant and experimental essays. Through close reading of both long-established and emerging essayists we will discover how this unique form handles powerful subjects that range from the intimately personal to internationally relevant, with the capacity to create change and shape ideas. We will study the ways in which successful essays integrate personal experience and rigorous research to move and inform their audience, including work from authors such as Joan Didion, Phllip Lopate, Susan Sontag, Cheryl Strayed, John McPhee, James Baldwin, Roxanne Gay, Lena Dunham and others. Essays are not limited to the written word. We will also explore range of multimodal genres such as video essay, photo essay, graphic essay, audio essay and lyric essay.

220.033: Expository Writing: INSERT CULTURE: The American Novel As Film

TR 17:00-18:15
Jill Dehnert, jdehnert@unm.edu

2013 was deemed by many the year of the "Literary Movie," with "movie producers raiding bookshelves more than ever before." Which begs the questions: Why? What is it about the novel form that speaks to film? And how does this trend affect American pop culture? In this English 220 section we will investigate the novel form, its history, and its adaptations to film. We will read these very different novels: The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Sin City by Frank Miller, The Virgin Suicides by Jeffrey Eugenides, and Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn. Additionally, we will consult the rhetorical text Compose, Design, Advocate by Anne Frances Wysocki. We will also view and analyze the film adaptations of these books. Dis cussions and writing assignments will develop facility interpreting visual and written rhetoric, advance critical thinking and research skills, and further develop students' ability to write and present ideas and arguments. 

220.035: Expository Writing

MWF 1300-1350 
Marisa Clark clarkmp@unm.edu

220.036: Who's Talking Now, Whose Talking How?--Contemporary Voices in Multicultural Poetics

TR 14:00-15:15
Lucy Burns, lkburns@unm.edu

When you think of poetry is Shakespeare the only name that comes to mind? Tired of reading poetry from hundreds of years ago? Can't relate to the concerns of dead poets? In this course, we will explore a diverse set contemporary voices in American poetry reading poems published as recently as 2014. Publishing continues to privilege white male voices, and so we will take the opportunity to read poetry by Claudia Rankine, Franny Choi, and Natalie Diaz and many more who don't fit this demographic or cultural background. In addition to reading poets writing today, we will investigate the lineage of the poets we read. By examining these poets' influences we will come to a better understanding of th e concerns facing poetry and poets writing today. Our readings will lead us to a discussion of what is poetry and who decides. We will explore questions like is rap poetry? Where do we draw the line between poetry and music? Do we need to draw the line? And ultimately, does poetry matter? Don't miss this opportunity to investigate contemporary poetry and its many voices.  

224.004: Intro to Creative Writing

MW 17:00-18:15
Daniel Berger, dberg006@unm.edu

This intro course is intended for the student who is serious about writing, although all levels of experience are welcome. Throughout the semester, we will focus on various craft elements in the genres of creative nonfiction, fiction, and poetry. Those who have a genuine interest in literature and enjoy reading will especially be drawn to this class, as we will read various full-length books in each of the genres, as well as host in-class readings from some of our very own UNM authors.

224.009: Intro. to Creative Writing

Online
Lisa Chavez, ldchavez@unm.edu

This online introductory course will introduce students to the craft of writing literary fiction, poetry, and creative nonfiction. We will begin with issues that all genres share, and then go on to look at some of the conventions of the individual genres. Students should be prepared to learn to read like a writer, to try out a lot of different exercises, to learn the art of revision, and to write in all three genres. I also expect lively online discussion of the assigned readings, and there will also be an introduction to peer review in small groups. A final portfolio will include work in all three genres that has been revised during the course. Text required: Burroway, Janet.  Imaginative Writing: The Elements of Craft. 3rd edition. Penguin. New York: 2011 

240.001: Traditional Grammar

TR 1700-1815
Staff

240.002: Traditional Grammar

MWF 1100-1150
Staff

248.001: Middle-Earth, Middle Ages: Tolkien and the Medieval Past

MWF 1400-1450 
Megan Abrahamson, maeglin@unm.edu

J.R.R. Tolkien's Middle-Earth, made famous in the novel and film versions of The Lord of the Rings, is a fictional world steeped in medieval language, culture, and literature. In this class, you will learn about the field of medievalism while discovering how the father of high fantasy, and modernist medieval scholar, J.R.R. Tolkien, viewed the Middle Ages. We will survey (in translation) the Old English, Middle English, Norse and Celtic medieval texts that influenced Tolkien, and in turn we will use Tolkien as a bridge to better understand the medieval past.

249.001: Introduction to Studies in English

W 1100-1215
Sharon Warner, swarner@unm.edu

249.002: Introduction to Studies in English

T 1100-1215
Sharon Warner, swarner@unm.edu

250.001: Literary Textual Analysis

MW 1700-1815
Karen Roybal, kroybal1@unm.edu

250.002: Literary Textual Analysis

TR 1400-1515
Kadeshia Matthews, kadeshia@unm.edu

250.003: Analysis and Interpretation of Literature

MWF 1100-1150
Belinda Deneen Wallace, bwallace@unm.edu

Through an examination of contemporary Caribbean women's literature, this section of English 250 will introduce students to a number of literary genres--novel, essay, poetry, and short story--and several modes of theory and criticism--black feminist thought & womanism, postcolonialism, mestiza consciousness, new historicism, and formalism. My course is designed to introduce students to literary analysis and theory formation while promoting creative critical thinking. The Caribbean women writers we will examine include Julia Alvarez, Edwidge Danticat, and Jamaica Kincaid. These writers, among others, offer intriguing narratives which allow for complex analysis on the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality as we seek to understand the postcolonial Caribbean experience.

250.004: Literary Textual Analysis

TR 0930-1045
Carolyn Woodward, woodward@unm.edu

This English 250 class offers study and practice of literary theory (formalism, structuralism, deconstruction, psychoanalytic theory, gender theories, literary-cultural theories, and eco-criticism), grounded in analysis of Shakespeare's comedy As You Like It, Daniel Defoe's novel Moll Flanders, and a collection of poetry.  You will write three short papers and one final research paper of 8-10 pages.  

265.001: Intro to Chicano/a Literature

TR 1230-1345
Melina Vizcaino-Aleman, mviz@unm.edu

This introductory course to Chicano/a literature will examine a variety of literary genres--poetry, short fiction, and novels--to explore the historical development of Chicano/a social and literary identity. We'll cover several time periods, beginning with the nineteenth century and concluding with contemporary works, and we'll focus on important issues such as race, class, gender, religion, family, education, language, and the act of writing itself. We'll examine the way writers represent the complexities of being caught between Mexican and American cultures, and we'll also consider key literary concepts that shape and define Chicana/o literary production. By the end of the class, we'll have a comprehensive understanding of the literary and historical formation of Chicana/o identity and the complex, even contradictory, experiences that characterize Chicana/o culture. 

290.001: Introduction to Professional Writing

MW 1700-1815
Stephen Benz, sbenz@unm.edu

The main purpose of ENGL 290 is to give you a basic understanding of what professional writers and editors do. This course introduces you to the practices and procedures of professional writing and editing. It also covers career opportunities available in professional writing. You will learn about expository writing style, persuasion, and document design. You will also learn how to deal with ethical situations that often arise in corporate, professional, private, and public workplaces. Projects in this course will guide you through the process of document development and introduce you to the most common genres of workplace writing. These projects are designed to help you create some initial materials for a portfolio you can use when looking for an internship or employment in the field.    

292.001: World Literature: Ancient through Early Modern

MWF 1100-1150
Gary Harrison, garyh@unm.edu

Beginning with the earliest literatures of the Ancient World, working up through the Medieval Period and moving into the Early Modern period, this course will explore some of the key works of the world's literatures through the seventeenth century. Placing memorable plays, poems, and works of fiction in their cultural and histori cal contexts, we will not only gain a greater understanding of the development of literature and literary traditions in China, Mesopotamia, Greece, Rome, Japan, Persia, Arabia, Europe, India, and the Americas, but we will gain a sense of history and a sense of the differences and similarities that shape the varieties of human experience across time and cultures. As we marvel at powerful tales about love and war, heroic journeys, spiritual pilgrimages, courtly intrigue, and colonial contact we will be alert to the varying degrees that these works display the globalizing tendencies that have culminated in the richly diverse tapestry of the modern world. Readings will include all or parts of such works as the Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, The Ramayana, The Aeneid, The Inferno, and The Tale of Genji; selections from the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures, Bhagavad Gita, and Qur'an; plays by Aeschylus, Kalidasa, and Shakespeare; poetry by Sappho, Catullus, Li Bai, Ono no Kom achi, Petrarch, Ibn Hazm, and Farid ud-dun Attar; as well essays, letters and memoirs by Macchiavelli, Ibn Khaldun, Montaigne, and Columbus. Requirements will include several short papers, quizzes, and a midterm and final examination.   

295.001: Survey of Later English Literature

TR 1100-1215
Staff

295.002: Survey of Later English Literature

TR 1700-1815
Sinae Kang, sinaekg@unm.edu

Welcome to English 295! In this class we will explore representative English literary works from the Romantic period to later twentieth century. We will closely read and analyze the works through the lens of various literary movements as well as significant historical contexts of French Revolution, industrial revolutions, social reformations, and the World Wars. Postcolonial and postmodern concerns will also be examined in mid to later twentieth century works. We will see how literary texts initiate, provoke, and engage in critical dialogues with the historical, cultural, political, and economic context of their creation and consumption. We will apply interdisciplinary approach, so we will not only read a variety of genres including poetry, fiction, dram a, and nonfiction prose, but also look into some of the fine art and film works inspired by or closely related to the primary texts.

295.003: Survey of Later English Literature

TR 1100-1215 
Stephanie Spong, sdspong@unm.edu

297.002: Later American Literature

MWF 1300-1350
Kathryn Wichelns, wichelns@unm.edu

In this course, we explore American literature from the end of the Civil War to the present. Over the semester, we will contextualize the major movements comprising this 150-year arc, with an emphasis on literature as both reflecting and shaping social realities. In order to examine changing notions of individual and national identity--with a particular emphasis on discourses of race and racialization, region, gender, and sexuality--we will read work by Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Paul Laurence Dunbar, Edith Wharton, Henry James, Wallace Stevens, Nella Larsen, James Baldwin, Flannery O'Connor, Edward Albee, Américo Paredes, Denise Levertov, Cherrí­e Moraga, Kathy Acker, Suzan-Lori Parks, and Kirstin Valdez Quade. Students will be evaluated on active class participation, two short papers, and midterm and final examinations.  

297.003: Later American Literature

MW1700-1815
Natalie Kubasek, nkubasek@unm.edu

This course covers American literature from the Civil War to present day. We will read and analyze canonical and non-canonical authors and texts of a variety of genres including the short story, the novel, poetry, drama, and film. We will consider these authors and texts within the contexts of literary movements including Realism, Naturalism, Modernism and Postmodernism and in response to historical events and cultural ideologies. Finally, throughout our investigations, we will interrogate the meaning of "American" literature and cultural identity.

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300 Level Courses

304.001: Bible as Literature

TR 1230-1345 
Janet Gaines, jhgaines@unm.edu

308.001: The Jewish Experience in American Lit and Culture

TR  1400-1515 
Janet Gaines, jhgaines@unm.edu

315.001: The Literature of Black Masculinity

MW 1230-1345
Finnie Coleman, coleman@unm.edu

In our historical moment events ranging from the shooting of Trayvon Martin to the racial politics undergirding the 2012 Presidential election to the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri bring us face-to-face with racial tensions that bubble uneasily just beneath the surface of life in the United States, tensions that many of us do not fully understand.  This course is a celebration of the power, humor, intellect, dignity, and passion that undergird the works of Black male writers as they attempted to write themselves and their communities into being. We will explore literary works that illuminate the genesis of "Black Masculinity" and what it has meant to be a "Black Man in America" at watershed moments in U.S. history. Using a wide variety of short fiction and non-fiction reading assignments we will review early African American cultural history paying particular attention to the complexities of race and the rise of White Supremacy in American life. We will be particularly interested in the "language of resistance" found in texts written by Black men. Consequently, one of the primary objectives for the course will be gaining a better understanding of literary Black Nationalism. While readings from David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Henry Highland Garnet, and Martin Robison Delany will help us to better understand early Black Nationalism they will also provide important context for our study of Blackface Minstrelsy and the creation of the public image of Blackness that continues to circulate in popular media. The archetypes that we study in this section will in turn serve as a backdrop for our necessarily brief study of the Harlem Renaissance, the Back to Africa Movement, and early Pan-Africanism. We will then focus on two iconic novels by Richard Wright (Native Son) and Ralph Ellison (Invisible Man). James Baldwin's work will preface our conclusion where we will discuss excerpts from the Autobiography of Malcolm X, speeches and sermons by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. We will finish the course with Barack Obama's Dreams from My Father.    

320.01: Writing Across Academic & Public Cultures

MWF 1300-1350
Michelle Kells, mkells@unm.edu 

English 320 is an advanced introduction to composition from a rhetorical perspective. (*English 102, 219, 220, or 290 is prerequistite to English 320). The course will focus on the writing process, organization, style, revision, editing, communication strategies, and the use of ethnographic, library, and electronic sources of information. The course is designed to promote the cultivation of a network of relationships conducive to the development of emerging writers (through digital literacy, ethnographic, bibliographic, and other literacy sponsorship practices). The aim of ENG 320 is to actively engage you in writing and publishing for diverse audiences by helping you analyze rhetorical situations, construct interpretations of texts, and generate writing samples in a variety of genres. This course will explore the distinguishing features of genre as well as examine how the boundaries of genre become blurred in academic and public culture. During the semester, you will have extensive practice in writing, editing, and presenting your work. To support the emphasis on the writing process, multiple drafts of major projects are required as well as pre-writing and in-class assignments designed to develop critical thinking skills. Group work, writing circles, conferences, peer review, reader response journal writing, film viewing, and field exercises, and oral presentations are integral features of the course. Production of writing samples suitable for submission for publication and/or presentation in academic, popular, or public on-line venues will represent the capstone project of this course. The first half of the course will concentrate on the formation of the writer by exploring multiple voices and genres of writing. You will produce: Reader Response Journal; Literacy Narrative. The second half of the course will focus on generating texts for different readers by: Writing and Publishing for Academic Culture; Writing and Publishing for Public Culture. Required Texts The Norton Field Guide to Writing, Richard Bullock. Field Working: Reading and Writing Research. Bonnie Stone Sunstein and Elizabeth Chiseri-Strater. This I Believe II: More Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. Eds. Jay Allison and Dan Gediman.  

321.001: Intermediate Creative Writing Fiction

MW 1600-1715
Jack Trujillo, jacktru@unm.edu

321.002: Intermediate Creative Writing Fiction

TR 1100-1215
Jack Trujillo, jacktru@unm.edu

322.001: Intermediate Poetry Workshop

TR 1100-1215
Diane Thiel, dthiel@unm.edu

In this intermediate workshop course, class sessions will focus on particular techniques or elements of poetry (i.e.: diction, perspective, rhythm, forms of poetry, etc.). Exercises and assignments will accompany these discussions. Because students arrive in workshop courses with a variety of backgrounds, styles, and interests in poetry, discussions about lineage and the different schools of thought in poetry will be a vital element of the class. Some of this discussion will arise from the workshop of student poems. 

323.002: Intermediate Creative Writing Creative Nonfiction

MWF 1500-1550
Marisa Clark, clarkmp@unm.edu

323.003: Intermediate Creative Writing Creative Nonfiction

TR 1100-1215
Michelle Brooks, mbrooksteaching@gmail.com

This class focuses on writing and reading creative nonfiction, specifically memoir. There is a workshop component and additional readings.

324.002: Introduction to Screenwriting

W 1500-1745
William Nevins, wnevins@unm.edu

324.003: Introduction to Screenwriting

T 1800-2100
Matthew McDuffie, mcduffie@unm.edu

330.001: Modern Russian Culture

TR 1400-1515
Natalia Rud, nrud@unm.edu

333.001: Sex Gender in Ancient Religion

TR 1100-1215
Luke Gorton, lagorton@unm.edu

336.003: Divided Germany on Film

TR 1730-2000
Katrin Schroeter, katja@unm.edu

338.001: Prisons in Russian Literature

MW 1400-1515
Lisa Woodson, lwoodson@unm.edu

339.001: Mystery, Sci-Fi & Modern Japan

MW 1600-1715
Andre Haag, haag@unm.edu

347.001: Viking Mythology

TR 0930-1045
John Lindow

In this course we survey what remains of the textual evidence of the myth and religion of the Vikings. The Vikings gained notoriety and fame in the period c. 800-1100 CE for raiding and trading, from Britain to Russia, but the myth and religion reflected daily life at various social levels in the Nordic area. The best sources are two books from 13th-century Iceland, the Poetic Edda, a small compilation of mythic and heroic poems, and a treatise on poetry (also called Edda) by Snorri Sturluson, a poet, historian, and statesman. With a few additions, available electronically, these will form the basis of our analysis (as they do for scholars in this field). Textbooks: The Poetic Edda, transl. Carolyne Larringon (Oxford 2006); Snorri Sturluson: Edda, transl. Anthony Faulkes (1995). Written work: midterm examination, term paper (5-7 pp.), final examination. 

350.001: Medieval Tales of Wonder

MWF 0900-0950 
Ann D'Orazio, dorazio@unm.edu

Medieval literature contains countless examples of "tales of wonder." Such tales exist in romance, epic, and hagiography, among other genres. These narratives of the miraculous, fabulous beasts and locales, and heroic quests engage the reader in more than just imaginative landscapes and characters; they meditate upon questions of cross-cultural contact, faith, violence, law, love, class relations, and gender expression. In this course, we will examine medieval tales of wonder through a variety of readings including selections from Ælfric’s Lives of Saints, the Wonders of the East, the Saga of Burnt Njall, the Saga of the People of Laxardal, Dante's Inferno, Boccaccio's Decameron, Chaucer's The House of Fame, and Marie de France's Breton Lais. Most readings will be done with modern English translations. The class will require consistent and lively participation in activities and discussion. Students will be required to do an in-class presentation, a manuscript project, short reading responses, and two longer essays.  

351.001: Chaucer

MWF 1000-1050
Lisa Myers, myersl@unm.edu

This course will focus upon The Canterbury Tales, the final work and masterpiece of Geoffrey Chaucer, one of the greatest writers in the English language. We will consider Chaucer within the historical context of the tumultuous fourteenth century, a time of plague and famine, political uprising and religious rebellion. Discrediting the myth of the Middle Ages as a time of repression and uniformity, this class will highlight issues of gender, class and race while examining the themes of equality, justice and exclusion. Primary texts will be read in Middle English, the language of Chaucer, with an emphasis upon accurate pronunciation, previous experience not required. In addition to familiarizing the student with the Middle English language, coursework and assignments are designe d to develop the student's knowledge of the conventions of medieval English poetry and to place the work of Chaucer within a historical and critical framework.  

352.011: Early Shakespeare

TR 1230-1345
Carmen Nocentelli, nocent@unm.edu

During the course of the semester, we will read and discuss seven plays penned during the early part of Shakespeare's career: The Taming of the Shrew, Titus Andronicus, Romeo and Juliet, A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Henry V, and Hamlet. The primary goal of this course will be to assist you in becoming active and perceptive readers of literary texts in general and early modern play-texts in particular. This means not only to be able to find for yourself what a particular text amounts to, but also to perform independent research, synthesize scholarly arguments, and show by careful and consistent argument how you have arrived at your reading. This also means that there will be relatively little lecturing on my part, and that you will be required to attend regularly, read all assigned material carefully (using the supplied reading guides when appropriate), and contribute thoughtfully to class discussion.   

353.001: Later Shakespeare

MW 1400-1515
Barry Gaines, bjgaines@unm.edu 

353.002: Later Shakespeare

MW 1230-1345
Barry Gaines, bjgaines@unm.edu

364.001: Native Literatures and Rhetorics

W 1600-1830
N. Scott Momaday, nmomaday@unm.edu

388.001: Literature and Culture of the Southwest / New Mexico Literature and Culture

TR 0930-1045
Daniel Worden, dworden@unm.edu

A NEW COURSE, TEAM TAUGHT BY PROFESSORS MELINA VIZCAINO-ALEMAN & DANIEL WORDEN! New Mexico and the greater Southwest has long been a contested region, and southwestern literature, film, and art provides rich accounts of the beauty, borders, communities, and violence that have given the Southwest such a unique history and arts culture. In this course, we will explore how New Mexico and the greater Southwest have played prominent roles in 19th- and 20th-century art, literature, and film. From late 19th- and early 20th-century film and print culture, to expatriate modernist communities in Santa Fe and Taos, western genre films, and the resurgence of Chicana/o and Native American literature in the late 20th century, this course will focus on how the history of 19th- and 20th-century art and literature can be read through New Mexico and the Southwest. This course will also consider the importance of Spanish colonial and Mexican texts, and it will make use of some of the University of New Mexico's unique collections of art and literature at the Center for Southwest Research and the University Art Museum. At the CSWR and the Art Museum, we will look at dime novel westerns, modernist "little" magazines, rare books, drawings, and photographs made in and about New Mexico and the Southwest. Over the course of the semester, we will develop ways to think about the Southwest through the region's long history as well as its contemporary urban, suburban, and rural environments. Readings will likely include works by Rudolfo Anaya, Mary Austin, Willa Cather, Ana Castillo, Fray Angélico Chávez, Tony Hillerman, D.H. Lawrence, Cormac McCarthy, N. Scott Momaday, and Leslie Marmon Silko; films will likely include The Rattlesnake, The Searchers, Johnny Guitar, El Mariachi, Smoke Signals, Gas, Food, Lodging and The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, as well as selections from the TV series Breaking Bad

388.002: Literature and Culture of the Southwest / New Mexico Literature and Culture

TR 0930-1045
Melina Vizcaino-Aleman, mviz@unm.edu 

A NEW COURSE, TEAM TAUGHT BY PROFESSORS MELINA VIZCAINO-ALEMAN & DANIEL WORDEN! New Mexico and the greater Southwest has long been a contested region, and southwestern literature, film, and art provides rich accounts of the beauty, borders, communities, and violence that have given the Southwest such a unique history and arts culture. In this course, we will explore how New Mexico and the greater Southwest have played prominent roles in 19th- and 20th-century art, literature, and film. From late 19th- and early 20th-century film and print culture, to expatriate modernist communities in Santa Fe and Taos, western genre films, and the resurgence of Chicana/o and Native American literature in the late 20th century, this course will focus on how the history of 19th- and 20th-century art and literature can be read through New Mexico and the Southwest. This course will also consider the importance of Spanish colonial and Mexican texts, and it will make use of some of the University of New Mexico's unique collections of art and literature at the Center for Southwest Research and the University Art Museum. At the CSWR and the Art Museum, we will look at dime novel westerns, modernist "little" magazines, rare books, drawings, and photographs made in and about New Mexico and the Southwest. Over the course of the semester, we will develop ways to think about the Southwest through the region's long history as well as its contemporary urban, suburban, and rural environments. Readings will likely include works by Rudolfo Anaya, Mary Austin, Willa Cather, Ana Castillo, Fray Angélico Chávez, Tony Hillerman, D.H. Lawrence, Cormac McCarthy, N. Scott Momaday, and Leslie Marmon Silko; films will likely include The Rattlesnake, The Searchers, Johnny Guitar, El Mariachi, Smoke Signals, Gas, Food, Lodging and The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada, as well as selections from the TV series Breaking Bad.  

388.003: Filming the Holocaust

T 1600-1830
Sheri Karmiol, metzger@unm.edu

The Holocaust continues to be a powerful event in human history, and like all transformative events, it has been, and continues to be, memorized in film. In this class, we will examine how the Holocaust is depicted in popular film. By examining a selection of films, literature, and critical reading, students will have the opportunity to consider the controversies associated with filming the Holocaust. Some essential questions to consider, include the following: Does it matters if a film is historically accurate, as long as it keeps the subject in front of the public? Or do popular films feed the frenzy of Holocaust deniers, who seize upon inaccuracies in film as a way to support their agenda? Are these films influencing public perception about the Holocaust? What does it mean to "sell" the Holocaust? And what story(ies) are these filmmakers/films selling? Texts: Langer, Art from the Ashes: A Holocaust Anthology; Bergen, War and Genocide: A Concise History of the Holocaust; selected readings available online at elibrary Assignments: film responses & critiques and a final research project & paper. This course is also cross-listed in Religious Studies: 347.003    

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400 Level Courses

413.001: Scientific, Environmental, and Medical Writing

TR 0930-1045
Joseph Bartolotta, jbartolotta@unm.edu

416.001: Biography

M 1900-2130 
David Dunaway, dunaway@unm.edu

This course explores how lives are told. By reading biographies and autobiographies of three major American authors (Twain, Kerouac, and Angelou), we compare narrative strategies to document a person's life. Using techniques of oral reminiscence, journal writing, literary recollection, and cultural research, students write a chapter of a biography or autobiography. (Post-Graduates write both.) This class will help students write and criticize biography and autobiography. Class work and reading emphasize both writing and literary history toward a clear end: the composition of a chapter with notes. Students contrast biographies and autobiographies to compare organization, stylistics, narrative strategy, and research. Our semester is divided into three parts: methodology and organization, study of specific lives, and class presentations. Class discussion will be both theoretical and practical, based on the instructor's experience as a biographer. The course fulfills advanced requirements in our Writing (creative non-fiction) and Literature (American) programs. Those planning biographical research as part of a thesis or dissertation are encouraged to enroll. Texts: Autobiography of Mark Twain, Charles Neider, ed.; Mr. Clemens and Mark Twain, Justin Kaplan; Kerouac, Ann Charters; On The Road, Jack Kerouac, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou, How Can I Keep From Singing: Pete Seeger, David Dunaway. 

417.001: Editing

MWF 1300-1350
Nick DePascal, depascal@unm.edu

418.010: Proposal and Grant Writing

Online 
Monica Kowal, kowal1@unm.edu

This advanced workplace writing course concentrates on long, formal documents, specifically proposals and grants, found in a wide variety of organizations. Through a semester-long, service-learning project, you will be given a real-world opportunities to enhance your professional writing skills by working with local organizations. Through the course, you will develop the critical thinking and writing skills required to: Work with an organization to effectively define a problem or recognize an opportunity; Map a viable plan in partnership with their community partner; Research funding options and create funding relationships; and Communicate information to their client and leverage collaboration. You will become familiar with the funding environment, distinguish among different types of grants, identify potential funders, plan and write a grant, and understand the submission and review process. Through selected learning opportunities (e.g., lectures, discussions, case studies, guest speakers, and class activities), we will experience the range of activities involved in grant writing and proposal development. Each student will have the option of writing for a pre-determined organization or developing your own relationship with a nonprofit business or organization to develop his or her final proposal project. Service-Learning Component.  You will gain experience with proposal writing by becoming immersed in a problem-solving proposal-development experience with a New Mexico-based community partner, using the research techniques, project management, editing and document design skills learned in this course. Through this partnership you will also learn the value of connections among individuals in the workplace and across institutions. A range of project options will be pitched at the beginning of the course, and you will decide which project is the best fit for you. 

420.001: Blue Mesa Review

MW 1400-1450; F 1500-1700 
Emily Rapp, erapp@unm.edu

420.002: Sylistics Analysis

TR 0800-0915
Jerry Shea, jshea@unm.edu

421.002: Advanced Creative Writing Fiction

MWF 1400-1450
Dan Mueller, dmueller@unm.edu

421.010: Advanced Creative Writing Fiction

Online
Julie Shigekuni, jshig@unm.edu

422.001: Advanced Poetry Workshop

TR 1230-1345
Diane Thiel, dthiel@unm.edu

Because students arrive in an advanced workshop with a variety of backgrounds, styles, and interests in poetry, our readings, workshop, and commentary reflecting lineage and the different schools of thought in poetry will be a vital element of the class. The assigned readings from authors of various backgrounds will encourage conversations about the connections between culture, form and content. Although the assigned readings might not always be discussed explicitly, they will inform and enrich the workshop discussions. Numerous creative exercises and assignments will accompany discussion of the particular elements. Students will also be workshopping several poems throughout the course. Students will write one essay due at the end of the semester; this piece will focus on a poet or poets selected from our class texts. The essay might respond to the selected work in a "personal" way (as a writer engaged in the art). Class portfolios will be due at the end of the semester. Grading will be based on the portfolio of work produced during the class, as well as workshop participation. Portfolios will be about 20-25 pages, including poetry, revisions, a revision narrative, and the essay.

423.002: Adv Creative Writing Nonfiction

MWF 1400-1450 
Lisa Chavez, ldchavez@unm.edu

This is an advanced creative writing workshop in creative nonfiction. This class presupposes a certain understanding of the genre: ie. at least a basic understanding of the use scene and dialogue and reflection. Our goals in this course will be to hone craft skills, try out new techniques in exercises, and practice revision skills. While we will read the work of published authors and explore the variety of types of essays that fall into the category of creative nonfiction, we will primarily focus on workshopping student work.   

424.001: Creative Writing Workshop Script

R 1700-2000
Matthew McDuffie, mcduffie@unm.edu

432.003: Navajo Literature and Rhetoric

TR 1400-1515
Luci Tapahonso, Tapahons@unm.edu

What does "Walk in Beauty" mean? We will contemplate how the Dine' philosophy of "hozho" or "beauty" formulates Navajo identity, secures one's relationship to the natural world, and how this precept serves as the foundation of contemporary and traditional Navajo life. This course will examine the implications of "Walk in Beauty" through various genres including stories, poetry, films and memoir. Guest speakers include storytellers, traditional practitioners, herbalists and weavers. Students interested in literature, Indigenous literary theory, cross cultural studies, and American Indian history and lifestyles will find this course professionally and personally illuminating. Participation is essential in this senior level class. Requirements include short essays, a research paper, and a presentation.       

ENGL 440.001: Language & Diversity

W 1600-1830
Michelle Kells, mkells@unm.edu 

ENGL 440/540 will provide intensive study in language and literacy for teachers of college writing (as well as K-12). This course will bring three intellectual operating spaces into conversation: Sociolinguistics, Composition Studies, and Second-Language Literacy Education. The aim of this course is to guide the examination of current theoretical and applied approaches to teaching ethnolinguistically-diverse populations. Selected readings will center on the nature of human language, the processes of discourse acquisition, and the multiple dimensions of communicative competence. Special focus will be given to the teaching of Composition informed by sociolinguistic theory and research. We will attend to issues of: ethnolinguistic identity, social stratification, linguistic racialization, language attitudes, institutionalized discrimination and non-standard language varieties as well as the ethical and social implications of hate-speech. This syllabus extends beyond the study of language structure and use (grammar and function) and moves toward applications of effective literacy practices as intellectual/critical acts of social participation. The core objective of this syllabus is to cultivate theoretical and pedagogical approaches to literacy education (informed by linguistics) that enhance student access and success. Readings, discussion, and writing assignments will focus on these and other questions: How does language shape identity? How do we acquire language? Why do languages and dialects vary? How do languages change? How do language attitudes impact speakers? Why do some languages and dialects represent social prestige and others social stigma? How does orality influence literacy? How does writing represent the writer? How do ethnolinguistically diverse students learn to write? Required Texts: Virginia P. Clark, Paul A. Eschholz, and Alfred F. Rosa, eds. Language: Readings in Language and Culture. 7th ed. Bruce Horner, Min-Zhan Lu, and Paul Kei Matsuda, eds. Cross Language Relations in Composition. R.A. Hudson. Sociolinguistics. Elizabeth Little. Trip of the Tongue   

441.001: English Grammars

TR 1230-1345
Bethany Davila, bdavila@unm.edu

The English language is a complex, rule-governed system that most of us use every day without having to think about what we need to know in order to speak the language. In this course, we will attempt to bring your tacit knowledge to the surface. We'll consider grammatical categories and rules, the effects of grammar, and actual usage. And, finally, no conversation about grammar is complete without considering the social and educational issues tied up in language, including the relationship between language and identity, attitudes toward dialects, the teaching of "standard" English, and bilingual education. Course work will consist of frequent short assignments, several short formal papers, and a final research project.   

445.001: History of the English Language

MW 1100-1215
Jonathan Davis-Secord, jwds@unm.edu

The English language can be traced back many centuries to a form nearly unrecognizable to most modern speakers. Nonetheless, present-day English still contains many significant features of its previous incarnations. This course will examine the history of English from its Indo-European roots through its medieval developments to its modern, international forms. In the process, students will learn methods of linguistic analysis and description along with the historical contexts of the developments. No previous knowledge of Old or Middle English is necessary.

449.001: Middle English Language

R 1600-1830
Anita Obermeier, aobermei@unm.edu

This course provides an introduction to those principal dialects of Middle English, demonstrated by selected readings, in the context of the development of the language from Old English to Early Modern English (c. 1150-1500). We will be looking at the language both diachronically (the historical development) and synchronically (the differentiation of dialect features at a given time). The primary goal of the course is to familiarize students with the range of texts available in different dialects during the period. Students should, for example, be able at the end of the course to read Sir Gawain and the Green Knight in the original North-West Midlands dialect with a full appreciation of the contribution of the language to the artistry of the poem, and to recognize its difference from the London dialect of Chaucer. Assignments will include take-home exercises, a midterm, a final, and a group translation project.  

453.001: The 17th Century: Non-Shakespearean Renaissance Drama

TR 1100-1215
Marissa Greenberg, marissag@unm.edu

In 1592 the poet Robert Greene described William Shakespeare as "an upstart crow, beautified with our feathers, that with his tiger's heart wrapped in a player's hide, supposes he is as well able to bombast out a blank verse as the best of you, and being an absolute Johannes fac totum, is in his own conceit the only Shake-scene in a country." In Greene's unflattering portrait, Shakespeare is an actor playing at being a dramatist, a Jack of all trades but master of none, and an egotist whose best stuff is stolen from other writers. Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, Philip Massinger, Thomas Dekker, John Webster, and John Fletcher--although these writers may be relatively unknown today, they enjoyed incredible popularity in Renaissance England. In this course we will read works by some of these other and (according to Greene) better dramatists. We will focus on plays written for the popular stage between the death of Queen Elizabeth in 1603 and the closing of London's theaters in 1642. The principal goal of this course is to familiarize students with this body of theatrical literature and the conditions of its performance. Class will be organized around student writing and discussion. Prerequisite: ENGL294 (Survey of Early English Literature), ENGL352 (Early Shakespeare), or ENGL353 (Later Shakespeare).

455.001: British Women Writers 1740-1820: Seduction, Rape, Courtship

TR 1230-1345
Carolyn Woodward, woodward@unm.edu

In the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the novels of women writers were best-sellers. Overwhelmingly, these fictions construct coercive sexual relations. Narratives of seduction, rape and courtship pointed up power dynamics in any relations of inequality and encouraged readers to think in general about the appropriate uses and locations of authority. Some questions will be important for us: How did people in the eighteenth century understand "seduction"? "rape"? "courtship"? What was "marriage," and what were the responsibilities and rights of a married woman? -a married man? How do these women writers represent sexual desire -in female characters? -in male characters? We will ground our study in feminist theory by Mary Astell (1700) and Mary Wollstonecraft (1792), and we will read these novels: Eliza Haywood's Anti-Pamela and Miss Betsy Thoughtless, Charlotte Lennox's The Female Quixote, Sarah Fielding's The Countess of Dellwyn, Frances Burney's Cecilia, and Jane Austen's Pride & Prejudice.  Four discussion questions, five short papers, one research paper.  

462.001: American Realism and Naturalism

MWF 1400-1450
Kathleen Washburn, washburn@unm.edu

The period from the end of the Civil War to the turn of a new century brought tremendous structural and cultural change to the United States, from the South during Reconstruction and the American West under federal Indian policy to major cities experiencing explosive growth. Embedded in broader debates about industrial labor and class stratification, the impact of new technologies, the rise of the New Woman, and the imperial designs of US democracy, writers explored various strategies to account for and reimagine life "as it really is."This course examines American realism and naturalism as interconnected literary movements that address the parameters of objectivity and the very nature of human experience in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  The course will focus primarily on short fiction and novels by writers including Rebecca Harding Davis, Sarah Orne Jewett, Zitkala-Sa, Henry James, Stephen Crane, Charles Chesnutt, W.E.B. Du Bois, Edith Wharton, and Sui Sin Far. Course requirements include a short writing assignments, a group presentation, and a long essay (9-10 pages).    

468.001: Black Women Writers (Hurston, Walker, Morrison)

MW 1400-1515
Finnie Coleman, coleman@unm.edu

This course celebrates the writings of Zora Neale Hurston, Alice Walker, and Toni Morrison. We will begin with a sweeping historical review of literature by Black women writers from 1746 through the end of the Harlem Renaissance. We will review early African diaspora history while discussing the literature, sorrow songs, and folktales that sustained Black communities during the holocaust that was the transatlantic slave trade. We will explore how the struggle for freedom, emancipation, Jim Crow, the cult of domesticity, and the ever-changing roles of Black women in postbellum America shaped African American literature well into the 20th century. We will move from the literature of slavery to the age of the "New Negro" where we will briefly explore the genesis of the Gospel, Blues, and Jazz before sampling the literature of the Harlem Renaissance. This literary historiography will serve as a foundation for a more detailed exploration of Hurston, Walker, and Morrison as they use their novels to critique race, class, gender inequity, patriarchy, and white privilege in America. We will focus on three iconic texts; Their Eyes Were Watching God, The Color Purple, and Beloved. In addition to reading these texts, we will screen films based on these novels.  

470.001: Modernist Literature

MWF 1100-1150
A. Marquez, amarquez@unm.edu

This course will concentrate on classic modernist novels from British/ American Literature. Ranging from Naturalism to Existentialism, we will consider major literary movements and examine the cultural and historical contexts of the novels. Readings: Chopin, THE AWAKENING; Conrad, HEART OF DARKNESS; Joyce, A PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS A YOUNG MAN; Wharton, THE HOUSE OF MIRTH; Woolf, TO THE LIGHTHOUSE; Hemingway, THE SUN ALSO RISES; Cather, THE PROFESSOR'S HOUSE, Faulkner, THE SOUND AND THE FURY; West, THE DAY OF THE LOCUST; Fitzgerald, TENDER IS THE NIGHT; Wright, NATIVE SON. 

499.001: Internship

TR 1700-1615
Joseph Bartolotta, jbartolotta@unm.edu

ENGL 499 is a seminar course designed to prepare students in the Professional Writing concentration of the Department of English for careers after college. The scope of student interest is as broad as the scope of technical and professional writing. This course is restricted by instructor permission. Students must fill out an application found here: http://english.unm.edu/undergraduate/advisement/internships/internshipdocuments/the-professional-writing-internship-application.pdf  and return it to pwinternship@unm.edu. Priority deadline is November 21st, and following applications will be handled on a rolling basis.

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500 Level Courses

511.011: French Cinema

W 1600-1830
Rajeshwari Vallury, rvallury@unm.edu

516.001: Biography

M 1900-2130
David Dunaway, dunaway@unm.edu

This course explores how lives are told. By reading biographies and autobiographies of three major American authors (Twain, Kerouac, and Angelou), we compare narrative strategies to document a person's life. Using techniques of oral reminiscence, journal writing, literary recollection, and cultural research, students write a chapter of a biography or autobiography. (Post-Graduates write both.) This class will help students write and criticize biography and autobiography. Class work and reading emphasize both writing and literary history toward a clear end: the composition of a chapter with notes. Students contrast biographies and autobiographies to compare organization, stylistics, narrative strategy, and research. Our semester is divided into three parts: methodology and organization, study of specific lives, and class presentations. Class discussion will be both theoretical and practical, based on the instructor's experience as a biographer. The course fulfills advanced requirements in our Writing (creative non-fiction) and Literature (American) programs. Those planning biographical research as part of a thesis or dissertation are encouraged to enroll. Texts: Autobiography of Mark Twain, Charles Neider, ed.; Mr. Clemens and Mark Twain, Justin Kaplan; Kerouac, Ann Charters; On The Road, Jack Kerouac, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, Maya Angelou, How Can I Keep From Singing: Pete Seeger, David Dunaway.   

520.001: Blue Mesa Review

MW 1400-1450; F 1500-1700
Emily Rapp, erapp@unm.edu

521.080: Creative Writing Workshop: Prose Fiction

Arranged
Dan Mueller, dmueller@unm.edu

522.001: Poetry Writing Workshop

R 1600-1830
Luci Tapahonso , Tapahons@unm.edu

This poetry workshop examines poetry through several lenses: your poetry as the main focus, careful critical responses to your peers' work as well as close studies of several contemporary American poets. You will write in open and fixed forms, and complete a portfolio of 15 poems during the semester. The course ends with a public reading by the class. Attendance and participation are critical in this course.

522.080: Creative Writing Workshop: Poetry

Arranged
Dan Mueller, dmueller@unm.edu

523.001: Creative Writing Workshop: Creative Nonfiction

1600-1830
Emily Rapp, erapp@unm.edu

523.080: Creative Writing Workshop: Creative Nonfiction

Arranged
Dan Mueller, dmueller@unm.edu

538.001: Writing Theory for Teachers

M 1600-1830
Todd Ruecker, truecker@unm.edu

Although a relatively young discipline, composition studies has a rich history with many areas of inquiry that influence the work we do as teachers of writing. In this course, we will explore these many areas by going to the research directly: reading and discussing articles published in various composition journals over the last several decades. We will explore theories of audience, genre, process, collaboration, second language acquisition, multimodal composition, among others. By the end of the course, students should emerge with a broad understanding of various theories circulating in composition and have the understanding necessary to pursue further work in a particular area. Class work will include weekly readings (typically 4-5 articles) and responses, a synthesis of work on a particular topic, and a final paper exploring a particular theory in depth.

539.001: Teaching Professional Writing

TR 1400-1515
Joseph Bartolotta, jbartolotta@unm.edu

Professional writing today is about far more than just composing clean technical descriptions and instruction sets. It is about sharing knowledge in a user-centered approach that delivers important information to people who need it most. This course prepares teachers to instruct courses such as ENGL 219 by establishing a sound theoretical and practical foundation to teaching technical and professional communication. This course will also help teachers develop professional teaching portfolios and address concerns that rise in the technical writing classroom. Students will walk out of this course with a syllabus and assignments ready to use in a technical and professional writing course. This course will also explore issues pertaining to social justice and community-engaged scholarship in professional communication, topics related to writing across the curriculum and writing in the disciplines, and the role of multimedia design in the delivery and dissemination of technical information. Please join us for an exciting semester!   

ENGL 540.001: Language & Diversity

W 1600-1830
Michelle Kells, mkells@unm.edu

ENGL 440/540 will provide intensive study in language and literacy for teachers of college writing (as well as K-12). This course will bring three intellectual operating spaces into conversation: Sociolinguistics, Composition Studies, and Second-Language Literacy Education. The aim of this course is to guide the examination of current theoretical and applied approaches to teaching ethnolinguistically-diverse populations. Selected readings will center on the nature of human language, the processes of discourse acquisition, and the multiple dimensions of communicative competence. Special focus will be given to the teaching of Composition informed by sociolinguistic theory and research. We will attend to issues of: ethnolinguistic identity, social stratification, linguistic racialization, language attitudes, institutionalized discrimination and non-standard language varieties as well as the ethical and social implications of hate-speech. This syllabus extends beyond the study of language structure and use (grammar and function) and moves toward applications of effective literacy practices as intellectual/critical acts of social participation. The core objective of this syllabus is to cultivate theoretical and pedagogical approaches to literacy education (informed by linguistics) that enhance student access and success. Readings, discussion, and writing assignments will focus on these and other questions: How does language shape identity? How do we acquire language? Why do languages and dialects vary? How do languages change? How do language attitudes impact speakers? Why do some languages and dialects represent social prestige and others social stigma? How does orality influence literacy? How does writing represent the writer? How do ethnolinguistically diverse students learn to write? Required Texts: Virginia P. Clark, Paul A. Eschholz, and Alfred F. Rosa, eds. Language: Readings in Language and Culture. 7th ed. Bruce Horner, Min-Zhan Lu, and Paul Kei Matsuda, eds. Cross Language Relations in Composition. R.A. Hudson. Sociolinguistics. Elizabeth Little. Trip of the Tongue   

540.002: Adult ESL Identities

T 1900-2130
Bee Chamcharatsri, bee@unm.edu

541.001: English Grammars

TR 1230-1345 
Bethany Davila, bdavila@unm.edu

The English language is a complex, rule-governed system that most of us use every day without having to think about what we need to know in order to speak the language. In this course, we will attempt to bring your tacit knowledge to the surface. We'll consider grammatical categories and rules, the effects of grammar, and actual usage. And, finally, no conversation about grammar is complete without considering the social and educational issues tied up in language, including the relationship between language and identity, attitudes toward dialects, the teaching of "standard" English, and bilingual education. Course work will consist of frequent short assignments, several short formal papers, and a final research project.  

543.001: Contemporary Texts in Rhetoric

T 1600-1830 
Chuck Paine, cpaine@unm.edu

545.001: History of the English Language

MW 1100-1215
Jonathan Davis-Secord, jwds@unm.edu

The English language can be traced back many centuries to a form nearly unrecognizable to most modern speakers. Nonetheless, present-day English still contains many significant features of its previous incarnations. This course will examine the history of English from its Indo-European roots through its medieval developments to its modern, international forms. In the process, students will learn methods of linguistic analysis and description along with the historical contexts of the developments. No previous knowledge of Old or Middle English is necessary.

549.001: Middle English Language

R 1600-1830
Anita Obermeier, aobermei@unm.edu

This course provides an introduction to those principal dialects of Middle English, demonstrated by selected readings, in the context of the development of the language from Old English to Early Modern English (c. 1150-1500). We will be looking at the language both diachronically (the historical development) and synchronically (the differentiation of dialect features at a given time). The primary goal of the course is to familiarize students with the range of texts available in different dialects during the period. Students should, for example, be able at the end of the course to read /Sir Gawain and the Green Knight in the original North-West Midlands dialect with a full app reciation of the contribution of the language to the artistry of the poem, and to recognize its difference from the London dialect of Chaucer. Assignments will include take-home exercises, a midterm, a final, and a group translation project.  

553.001: The 17th Century: Revolutionary Literature: Donne, Jonson, Milton, Cavendish

T 1600-1830
Marissa Greenberg, marissag@unm.edu

Scholars of English literature and culture often refer to the seventeenth century as the "century of revolutions." Religious crises, urbanization, political upheaval, scientific discovery, and the debate on women--these radical changes not only provided the context for composition and reception but also shaped the very means by which writers engaged with the transformations of their historical moment. In this course we will focus on works by four writers during this transformative period: John Donne, Ben Jonson, John Milton, and Margaret Cavendish. Each of these writers composed in more than one genre and for more than one audience. The principal goal of this course is to provide students with an in-depth introduction to these writers' works and thus a solid foundation in seventeenth-century English literature and culture. A second goal is to allow students opportunity to bring seventeenth-century literature and culture into dialogue with their primary fields of study, whether medieval studies or rhetoric or modernist poetry. To achieve both of these goals, we will read a selection of poetry, prose, and drama by our four writers in conjunction with recent scholarship that reveals ongoing revolutions in Renaissance studies and literary studies more generally, including reassessments of historicism, new formalism, ecocriticism, mobility studies, the religious turn, and the digital humanities. Students will write or respond to their peers' writing on a weekly basis and produce a critical research paper.

556.001: British Romanticism

W 1600-1830
Gary Harrison, garyh@unm.edu

This course will be concurrently taught with English 561 "American Romanticism"; the combined courses will compare and contrast British and American literary and cultural practices from roughly 1765 to 1865. The motive behind the combined courses, well formulated by Paul Giles, is "bring [American and British] literary and generic models into a suggestive dialogue with cultural and historical contexts" (Transatlantic Insurrections 15). Throughout the semester we will structure dialogic encounters of writers working in a variety of genres on both sides of the Atlantic, beginning with Olaudah Equiano, Washington Irving, and Simon Bolí­var whose work introduces and troubles the divide between British and American literary traditions. We will follow with pairings o r triangulations of writers whose work in some ways complement each other, while complicating or illustrating divergent tendencies in literary and cultural trends of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. Thus, we will study Foster alongside Wollstonecraft; Emerson alongside Coleridge; Cooper alongside Owenson; Wilson alongside Brontë; Whitman alongside Wordsworth and/or P.B. Shelley; Dickinson alongside Keats; Hawthorne alongside Byron, and Poe alongside M. Shelley. To establish an ongoing theoretical discussion, we will consider works symptomatic of the difficulties of establishing "romanticism" as a critical category or unified movement, as well as critical and theoretical works advancing various perspectives on transatlantic studies. To this end students will give presentations on theoretical works from the period (e.g. Rousseau, Kant, Schiller, De Staël, Emerson, et al.), as well as on critical works and essays by major critics in the field of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century transatlantic studies (e.g. Brantley, Gilroy, Giles, Jehlen, et al.). In presentations and critical essays, students will critically evaluate and define the distinctions between British and American romanticism; situate British and American texts of the early to mid-nineteenth century in their socio-historical and political contexts; and evaluate the viability and place of "romanticism" as a critical category in the transatlantic studies of the period.   

561.001: American Romanticism

W 1600-1830
Kathryn Wichelns, wichelns@unm.edu

This course will be concurrently taught with English 556, "British Romanticism"; the combined courses will compare and contrast British and American literary and cultural practices from roughly 1765 to 1865. The motive behind the combined courses, well formulated by Paul Giles, is "bring [American and British] literary and generic models into a suggestive dialogue with cultural and historical contexts" (Transatlantic Insurrections 15). Throughout the semester we will structure dialogic encounters of writers working in a variety of genres on both sides of the Atlantic, beginning with Olaudah Equiano, Washington Irving, and Simon Bolí­var whose work introduces and troubles the divide between British and American literary traditions. We will follow with pairings o r triangulations of writers whose work in some ways complement each other, while complicating or illustrating divergent tendencies in literary and cultural trends of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century. Thus, we will study Foster alongside Wollstonecraft; Emerson alongside Coleridge; Cooper alongside Owenson; Wilson alongside Brontë; Whitman alongside Wordsworth and/or P.B. Shelley; Dickinson alongside Keats; Hawthorne alongside Byron, and Poe alongside M. Shelley. To establish an ongoing theoretical discussion, we will consider works symptomatic of the difficulties of establishing "romanticism" as a critical category or unified movement, as well as critical and theoretical works advancing various perspectives on transatlantic studies. To this end students will give presentations on theoretical works from the period (e.g. Rousseau, Kant, Schiller, De Staël, Emerson, et al.), as well as on critical works and essays by major critics in the field of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century transatlantic studies (e.g. Brantley, Gilroy, Giles, Jehlen, et al.). In presentations and critical essays, students will critically evaluate and define the distinctions between British and American romanticism; situate British and American texts of the early to mid-nineteenth century in their socio-historical and political contexts; and evaluate the viability and place of "romanticism" as a critical category in the transatlantic studies of the period.   

562.001: American Realism and Naturalism

MWF 1400-1450
Kathleen Washburn, washburn@unm.edu

The period from the end of the Civil War to the turn of a new century brought tremendous structural and cultural change to the United States, from the South during Reconstruction and the American West under federal Indian policy to major cities experiencing explosive growth. Embedded in broader debates about industrial labor and class stratification, the impact of new technologies, the rise of the New Woman, and the imperial designs of US democracy, writers explored various strategies to account for and reimagine life "as it really is." This course examines American realism and naturalism as interconnected literary movements that address the parameters of objectivity and the very nature of human experience in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  The course will focus primarily on short fiction and novels by writers including Rebecca Harding Davis, Sarah Orne Jewett, Zitkala-Sa, Henry James, Stephen Crane, Charles Chesnutt, W.E.B. Du Bois, Edith Wharton, and Sui Sin Far. Course requirements include a short writing assignments, a group presentation, and a long essay (9-10 pages).    

586.001: British Fiction: 19th Century

WF 1230-1345
Gail Houston, ghouston@unm.edu

If the nineteenth century is considered the golden age of the novel, it is important to examine some of the subgenres that developed in this time period (these included the Newgate novel, the bildungsroman, the silver fork novel, the Condition of England novel, the domestic novel, the sensation novel, the detective novel, the New Woman novel, the gothic novel). In this course we will read examples of the British/Irish bildungsroman, the New Woman novel, the sensation novel, and the gothic novel to understand how anxieties about class, gender, and race are filtered through these texts. Authors include, Charlotte Brontë, Charles Dickens, Wilkie Collins, Ellen Wood, Sarah Grand, George Gissing, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Bram Stoker.

587.001: Genre Studies

T 1600-1830
Susanne Baackmann, theodor@unm.edu

587.002: Genre Studies: Blurred Boundaries

R 1600-1830
Greg Martin, gmartin@unm.edu

William Maxwell, in his novel/memoir So Long, See You Tomorrow, says that when we talk about the past we lie with every breath we take. This is a craft seminar which will explore the blurred boundaries between genres, investigating not only the "truth" and "invention" of fiction and nonfiction, but also the space between journalism and the personal essay, between biography and fiction, between the lyric and associative construction of poetry and the personal essay and booklength memoir. In all of our reading, we will look at how writers, implicitly and explicitly, manipulate the reader's desire for "literal" truth and the relative safety of the categories and conventions of genre. (In a story called "Love," the second story of Tim O' Brien's The Things They Carried, a fictional character, Tim O'Brien, a writer, is visited at home years after the war by a fictional character, Jimmy Cross, who tells him how to write the story, "The Things They Carried," which the reader just read.) The goal of the course is, at bottom, practical, to each week look at books, stories and essays and ask the questions: How was this made? How does this story work? How does a growing understanding of these stories shape my own work? Finally, another goal of the course is to develop theories of our own sensibility. Selected authors and readings include: Girl, Interrupted by Susanna Kaysen's Girl, Interrupted, Dave Eggers's What is the What?, Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, Nick Flynn's Another Bullshit Night in Suck City, W.G. Sebald's The Emigrants, Jo Ann Beard's Werner, essays and stories by Alice Munro, William Maxwell, Jamaica Kincaid, Tom Junod, Geoff Dyer, Lydia Davis and more.       

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600 Level Courses

640.001: Transgressing Rhetoric and Writing

TR 1100-1230 Online Component Required
Natasha Jones, nnjones@unm.edu

This course builds from bell hook's theoretical and pedagogical perspective that education should be liberatory and "transgressive." In other words, the classroom should be a space for students (and teachers) to express themselves and engage in ways of learning and knowing that may be outside of the traditional format--celebrating difference and diversity. To this end, this course will examine rhetoric and writing in nontraditional ways and as it impacts minority and marginalized populations. We will consider issues of identity, race, gender, sexuality, class, nationality, and ableism in rhetoric and writing and professional and technical communication. This course will be a "decentered" learning space and will likely feel very different from other courses that you have taken at the university. Students will be invited to embrace complexity, contribute to the learning environment and curriculum, and examine rhetoric and writing in ways that THEY feel are most in line with their scholarly identity. Please feel free to contact Dr. Jones with any questions.

650.001: Anglo-Saxon Evil

W 4:00-6:30
Jonathan Davis-Secord, jwds@unm.edu

Evil takes many forms in Anglo-Saxon literature: the devil, individual demons, monsters, sinners and their sins. Behind these various manifestations of evil lie two fundamental and competing conceptions of evil: one growing from the Christian, philosophical tradition and the other from non-Christian traditions that were still prevalent in Anglo-Saxon daily life. This seminar will examine different depictions and conceptions of evil in Anglo-Saxon literature and explores them through modern paradigms in order to understand the exact nature of evil according to the Anglo-Saxons. Prerequisite: reading knowledge of Old English.   

660.001: Print Cultures of Indian Country

M 1600-1930
Kathleen Washburn, washburn@unm.edu

This course takes up the renewed critical engagement with Native American literature from the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries in relation to the interdisciplinary field of print culture studies. This dynamic period corresponds to extraordinary growth in indigenous textual production, even as such "Indian books" often are linked in complex ways to Indian boarding schools, non-Native venues for publication and publicity, and the documentation of indigenous cultures through the emergent field of anthropology. From petitions against the annexation of Hawaii and tribal newspapers to short fiction in national magazines, we will investigate how texts from the so-called "assimilation era" both employ and reconfigure technologies of re presentation in various contexts.  Primary texts for the course include poetry, fiction, and nonfiction by Simon Pokagon, Liliuokalani, E. Pauline Johnson, Charles Eastman, Alexander Posey, Gertrude Bonnin, Carlos Montezuma, Laura Cornelius Kellogg, John Oskison, Mourning Dove, and Luther Standing Bear. Additional materials will be drawn from contemporary debates about indigenous literacies and textual histories, gendered reading practices, and intersecting critical methodologies such as tribal theory, material culture studies, and trans-indigenous exchange. Prior experience in Native American literature or indigenous studies is welcome but not required. Course assignments include a presentation, annotated bibliography, and final project    

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