Spring 2016 Course Descriptions

150.001: Study of Literature

TR 8:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.  
Amy Gore, gorea@unm.edu

Why does literature matter? Is reading literature different from reading other texts, and why? What does reading literature involve? Questioning the ways in which authors and critics construct literature helps us to see the ways we, and our worlds, are also constructed and interpreted. It can challenge us intellectually, and it can provoke us into acting differently in the world. It can expand our appreciation for quality and the experience of our short lives, jarring us out of the normal existence of the status quo. It can also provide a more satisfying relationship to the community around us. Consequently, the study of literature seeks to make potentially powerful and moving texts into ones that we can also understand and explain. This class intends to develop in students an appreciation for the study of literature, both in terms of its intellectual challenges and its aesthetic and imagination qualities, and it will do so by introducing students to the different components involved in the study of literature: close reading, critical thinking, analysis, interpretation and argument, and research.

150.002: Study of Literature

MWF 12:00 p.m. - 12:50 p.m.  
Katherine Alexander, kalex@unm.edu

This exciting multi-modal course will offer non-English majors an opportunity to study selected literary works from the seventeenth century to the present time in the genres of poetry, fiction, and drama from a variety of countries.  Learning key terminology and techniques applicable to each genre and work, students will engage in close reading of these texts and then write about them.  Assignments will include weekly blog posts and several papers as well as class presentations. The skills offered in this class will help students become good readers and good writers, both of which are desirable for most professions. We begin with writers such as Andrew Marvell, Sor Juana, and others from the seventeenth century.  Moving through the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries, the class will also offer selected works from both female and male writers.  Modern writers will include William Faulkner, Seamus Heaney, Jamaica Kincaid, and Sherman Alexie, Amy Tan, and Alice Walker, to name a few.  Join us if you want to sharpen your understanding of literature and enhance your writing skills.

150.003: Study of Literature

MWF 2:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.
Leandra Binder, lbinder@unm.edu

English 150 is intended to introduce non-English majors to literature. In this class, we will be reading examples of poetry, drama, short stories and the novel across a variety of cultures and eras. Students will learn about the techniques employed by different writers; further, we will discuss how knowledge of these techniques increases a reader’s enjoyment of literature. Students will also learn to analyze literary texts and to discuss literary conventions over time and in multiple genres. Three analytical papers (4-6 pages), short weekly reading journals, and a midterm and a final exam will be required.

150.005:  The Study of Literature 

Course Meets Second 8 Weeks
TR 9:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. 
Carolyn Woodward, woodward@unm.edu  

Problems of gender center our work in this section of English 150. We’ll read poetry—for example, British poet laureate Carol Ann Duffy’s “Mrs. Sisyphus” and T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land: “The Fire-Sermon” with its “carbuncular” bored lover.  Our study of fiction includes Daniel Defoe’s Roxana, in which the eponymous heroine follows a career of sexual intrigue and fraud in 18th century England, France and the Netherlands; and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s Half of a Yellow Sun, set in Nigeria during the Nigerian-Biafran war, which centers in the complex sexual and political conflicts experienced by the teenage village boy Ugwu, the urbane Olanna, and the white ex-patriot Richard.  We’ll read two Shakespeare plays, act out brief scenes, and watch film adaptations: the comedy Much Ado about Nothing features warring lovers; in the tragedy Macbeth, Lady Macbeth’s psychological force hurtles Macbeth into his blood-soaked downfall.  Two exams and three 4-6 page papers using methods of literary research.

220.001: Expository Writing

MWF 08:00 a.m. - 08:50 a.m.  
Charles Wormhoudt, cwormhoudt@unm.edu

Myths of the American West: Cowboys, Conservation, and the Counter Culture. In this course we will explore several core myths of the western United States: The West as ruggedly individualist frontier, as Edenic garden, as land of opportunity, and as Utopia. We will explore these myths as incarnated in a variety of cultural and historical contexts: the Wild West, waves of immigration past and present, the conservation movement, the hippie counterculture, Hollywood, and the cults of technology and progress of Silicon Valley. Course texts will include books such as Grapes of Wrath, The Tortilla Curtain, and the Solace of Open Spaces, and films by John Ford, Paul Thomas Anderson and others. 

220.002: Novels As Linked Stories

MWF 10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.
Celia Laskey, claskey@unm.edu

This class will examine novels that are comprised of linked short stories. We’ll focus on four main texts: 1) A Visit from the Goon Squad by Jennifer Egan 2) Olive Kitteridge by Elizabeth Strout 3) The Imperfectionists by Tom Rachman, and 4) In Other Rooms, Other Wonders by Daniel Mueenuddin. Discussion will be focused on what elements link the stories in each collection: Place? Family? Plot? Workplace? One central character? Connections between many different characters? Theme? Throughout the course of the semester, we will ask questions like: How strong is the connection between all the stories in each book? What degree of linkage is necessary for a book of short stories to be considered a novel? To what degree does publishing and marketing factor into the decision to publish a novel or a book of short stories? What advantages do linked stories have over the traditional novel, and what advantages does a traditional novel have over a book of linked stories? 

220.003: Hip Hop: The Intersection of Poetry, Storytelling and History

MWF 11:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Jason Thayer, thayerj@unm.edu

Can we categorize hip-hop as an offshoot of poetry?  Or is it more akin to narrative?  If so, should we evaluate it as fiction or as memoir?  The best hip-hop employs elements of all three genres.  As a result, when analyzing hip-hop, we must borrow strategies used to dissect poetry, fiction, and memoir.  In this class, students will begin by analyzing the poetic devices used in various hip-hop songs.  Next, they will describe the narrative arcs, themes, and characters that inhabit specific songs and albums.  Finally, students will research the historical context “the distinct environment and moment in history that birthed the work” and speculate on the influence that a rapper’s unique life experience has played in the construction of his or her art.  We’ll look at how the 90s crack epidemic influenced the story the Notorious B.I.G. tells in his 1993 album, Ready to Die.  We’ll investigate how Detroit’s economic apocalypse resulted in Danny Brown’s 2011 magnum opus, XXX. We'll explore the role that Compton’s gang violence, coupled with the escalation of police brutality and murder of unarmed black men, plays in propelling the potent narratives in Kendrick Lamar’s 2015 epic, To Pimp a Butterfly.  Texts like Jay Z's Decoded will help us understand how art imitates life in hip hop as we consider the work of rappers both mainstream and underground, spanning more than 30 years.  

220.004: Gothic Horror: Gender Construction Rhetoric in Frankenstein, Dracula, and The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde

MWF 1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.
Katherine Alexander, kalex@unm.edu

This multimodal English 220 course will explore several works in the genre of Gothic Horror under the lens of rhetoric. The purpose is to look at the rhetoric of gender constructions in several formats. Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s iconic work of 1818 begins the exploration.  The first edition of Frankenstein was heavily edited by Percy Bysshe Shelley.  Finally, in 1831, Mary Shelley’s version was published.  In this unit, students will compare the masculinist version edited by Percy to Mary’s version as they compare the rhetoric of the husband and wife. To enhance the experience, students will view excerpts from the 1931 film starring Boris Karloff to be followed by the Kenneth Branagh version of 1994.  These will be followed by Mel Brooks’ Young Frankenstein. Robert Louis Stevenson’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, a novella depicting the absolute binaries of good and evil is the subject of the second unit.  Film excerpts include the 1931 film starring Frederic March and the 1941 version starring Spencer Tracey.  Film works well for students of this era because they are visual.  The third unit involves the study of Bram Stoker’s Dracula of 1897.  This novel is important because it features the “new woman” who can work for a living as a typist. Stoker’s rhetoric attempts to find words for the anxieties facing late era Victorians. Film presentations include the Bela Lugosi production of 1931 and the Frank Langella product of 1979 as well as Mel Brooks’ Dead and Loving It starring Leslie Nielsen.  Supplementing the novels and films will be readings from M. Jimmie Killingsworth’ sAppeals in Modern Rhetoric and lectures from the instructor.

220.005: The Deaf Experience

MWF 12:00 p.m. -12:50 p.m.  
Deborah Wager, dwager@unm.edu

Deaf identity refers to more than just a lack of hearing. It encompasses linguistic, educational, and social perspectives and resources unique to the Deaf culture. Changes in education and technology over the last 200 years have influenced a culture of diverse individuals with common experiences. In this course we will explore the lived experiences and media representations of Deaf individuals from the 19th century to contemporary times, in the United States and other countries. Topics to be covered include language, education, media representations, and cultural norms and expectations of the Deaf community.

220.008: Expository Writing: Irony, Cynicism and Popular Culture

TR 5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.  
Will Barnes, whb100@unm.edu

This course will examine the concepts of irony and cynicism in contemporary popular culture including television, literature, music, fashion, movies, and academic writing “asking the questions: does the prevalence of cynicism in popular culture indicate an increasingly cynical worldview in general? And if so, what consequences may there be for the cynical generation? We will analyze the hero motif in American cinema, the evolution of the zombie myth, materialism in hip hop music, and political protest in punk, as well as hipster irony in sequence 1, cynicism in visual art and literature in the French enlightenment and European romanticism in sequence 2, and philosophical analyses and proposed solutions to cynicism in sequence 3. We will develop deep and nuanced responses and answers to our research question articulated in multi-modal and genre diverse media from blogs, PSA radio broadcasts and podcasts, screenplays, social media posts, professional pitches, group PowerPoint presentations and websites, culminating in a an in-depth academic research paper. No exams, significant student autonomy, issues directly applied to real life. 

220.009: The Politicization of Trauma: Mourning, Violence, Politics

TR 8:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.
Abigail Robertson, agrobertson@unm.edu

This course aims to look at various representations of violence and mourning in documentary and literature from the time of the Crusades through 9/11 with a simple question in mind: what is the rhetoric of mourning and violence and how is it politicized? Rather than interested in any political affiliation, this course is instead centered around understanding the methods by which violence and trauma are represented and how those representations influence our understanding of historical and contemporary events. By analyzing the texts, students will gain a more enriched understanding of the way that different forms of expository writing (both visual and aural) impact audiences of diverse demographics and how this has changed over time.  The way the Holocaust was represented at the end of World War II differs greatly from 9/11 and our current conception. Looking at these events of violence and tragedy, this course aims to promote discourse that questions the efficacy of new media forms in comparison to those in the past and raises questions about the objectives of each of these forms. To do this, students will read both contemporary fictionalized accounts of recent events, primary sources of historical ones, and view recently-produced documentaries that conceptualize the past in order to answer questions such as: how does this source influence our understanding of the past? what is the rhetorical role of this genre? how are violence and trauma politicized (or not) in these texts? Students will also compare fictionalized accounts of real events with reporting on those events by the news media in order analyze the ways in which form, genre, and structure inform audience.

220.011: Expository Writing

TR 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.  
Lauren Perry, perryl@unm.edu 

This is an introductory course that focuses on learning to critically read, contextualize, analyze, and respond to graphic novels as literary texts. Students will sample graphic novels of several styles & subgenres, ranging from autobiographical, historical, fantasy, science fiction, superheroes, and more. Supplemental texts and films will be used to help students understand the evolution of graphic novels as literature. This course will provide the history of 20th Century (primarily) American graphic novels in terms of printed material, content, and evolution in narratives and style. Students will explore comic theory, transitions, layouts, reader participation, language used in graphic novels, and how varying levels of thematic material are successfully conveyed through graphic narratives. Students will develop advanced writing and composition skills through performing critical analysis of texts that are comprised of both images and language, while challenging themselves to consider the advanced potential of graphic narratives to convey complex meaning. The course will define and contextualize terms such as high/low art, camp, iconography, semiotics, printing press technologies, the psychological processes involved in reading graphic texts.

220.012: Identity: From Poetry to Selfies

TR 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Kyle Fiore, kfiore@unm.edu

Identity: Ourselves and Others – “I contain multitudes" wrote poet Walt Whitman, referring to the many ways we see ourselves. From poetry and memoirs to art and selfies, we struggle with the question of, "Who am I?"  We also struggle to understand “Who are you?”  These two questions have joined and separated us from one another since the beginning of language. How do we see ourselves and how do others see us? How do we make our mark and how do we translate the marks of others?  In this course, we will study identity by considering how we have defined ourselves and other people in the past and the present, through art, writing, and activism. We will consider customs and rituals that bring us together and cultural differences that separate us. We will look at the actions people take to make their voices heard. Students will keep a journal, write a memoir, and research a biographic article. Short papers and multimedia pieces will culminate in a final semester project. Authors, artists, and activists we will study include: Tracy Chapman, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Emily Dickenson, Frederico Garcia Lorca, Frida Kahlo, Kee and Peele, Herman Melville, Janelle Monae, Tim O’Brien, Walt Whitman, Adele and others.

220.021: Expository Writing: The Monsters Within

-Online
Dalicia Raymond, dalicia@unm.edu

What makes a monster? What makes us human? This course will examine monsters in literature and pop culture and examine what these creatures tell us and teach us about being human, both on a societal and personal level.  Monsters such as werewolves and vampires have persisted from medieval and gothic literature into today’s pop culture, establishing, reinforcing, and reworking monster archetypes.  Using examples from canonical literature, popular fiction, television, and film, we will explore monster archetypes and work to define what makes a character a monster and how monsters complicate and clarify our humanity. This will construct the foundation for the final semester project in which students will select a type of monster for which they will research the history and analyze the function of this monster in a particular text.  

220.022: Expository Writing: Coming of Age in America

-Online
Jo Anna Phillips, jmphi@unm.edu

In this course, we will examine the coming of age motif under the lens of what it means to grow up American by comparing and contrasting stories which detail the different experiences and struggles that go hand-in-hand with growing up. Arching themes include race, gender, sexual and cultural identities, discrimination and violence in American society, and what constitutes the end of childhood. 

220.031: Identity: From Poetry to Selfies

TR 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Kyle Fiore, kfiore@unm.edu

Identity: Ourselves and Others - "I contain multitudes," wrote poet Walt Whitman, referring to the many ways we see ourselves. From poetry and memoirs to art and selfies, we struggle with the question of, "Who am I?" We also struggle to understand “Who are you?”  These two questions have joined and separated us from one another since the beginning of language. How do we see ourselves and how do others see us. How do we make our mark and how do we translate the marks of others?  In this course, we will study identity by considering how we have defined ourselves and others in the past and the present, through art, writing, and activism. We will consider customs and rituals that bring us together and cultural differences that separate us. We will look at the actions people take to make their voices heard. Students will keep a journal, write a memoir and research a biographic article.  Short papers and multimedia pieces will culminate in a final semester project. Authors, artists, and activists we will study will include: Tracy Chapman, Ta-Nehisi Coates, Emily Dickenson, Frederico Garcia Lorca, Kee and Peele, Herman Melville, Janelle Monae, Tim O’Brien, Walt Whitman, Amy Winehouse, Adele and others.

220.032: Eco-poetry: Writing About the Natural World

TR 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.
Lawrence Reeder, lreeder@unm.edu

“These woods are one of my great lies.  I pretend, oh I have always pretended, they were mine”, W.S. Merwin. In this class, we will explore how the natural world is represented in poetry. Specifically, we will be focusing on a western history of “nature writing”, how poets project their emotional landscapes onto the natural world and the effects thereof, and how it has evolved into poetry that is socially and environmentally concerned. We will assess how eco-poets aim to answer questions such as: How do we define nature? Who am I in this relationship with the natural world? And how is that relationship damaged? What should Eco-Poetry accomplish? Our goal in this class is allow this genre of poetry to facilitate a deeper understanding of the natural world and the human condition.

224.001: Intro to Creative Writing

MWF 10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.
Ana June, anajune@unm.edu

There are thousands of inspiring quotes about writing, but my personal favorite is one I stumbled across on Facebook: "Why I write: Because kidnapping people and forcing them to act out your interesting make-believe worlds is technically illegal." Of course, it's more than *technically* illegal, but the irreverence of this sentiment spoke to me. In fact, it sounds like a great premise for a short story. If you like to explore strange alternate worlds composed of your own words, you must take Intro to Creative Writing. In this class you will read, study, and write in three different genres: Poetry, Literary Fiction, and Creative Nonfiction. You'll engage in fun and inspirational activities designed to get your ideas flowing, and you'll put many words to the page. So don't be a criminal--enroll in Intro to Creative Writing!   

224.002: Intro to Creative Writing

MWF 1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.
Celia Laskey, claskey@unm.edu

Think about a piece of fiction, poetry, or creative nonfiction that has stayed with you. What about it was so memorable? It likely was because the narrator had a distinct, engaging voice. Voice is what makes a piece of writing sound like a unique person. You could call it the personality of the prose. You create voice through a combination of word choice, syntax, and the way the narrator sees the world. Voice is the first building block of creative writing - everything else stacks on top of it, and without it, a piece falls apart.  The secondary building blocks of creative writing include tone and mood, setting, round characters, point of view, narrative structure, and theme. Each week, we will complete a short writing exercise that’s based on a piece from a successful writer. We will do a close reading of this piece, and then emulate some of the moves the author made in order to understand how to be successful in our own work. Students will choose one of their short writing exercises to expand into a full-length short story, piece of creative nonfiction, or a collection of poems. 

224.003: Introduction to Creative Writing

TR 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Lawrence Reeder, lreeder@unm.edu

Hello, future writers! In this introduction to creative writing course we will focus our study in the genres of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. This course involves intensive reading and writing assignments for the purpose of examining the craft elements in each of the three genres. Additionally, as writers ourselves, we will practice implementing those elements to make our writing more vivid, energetic, and effective. Some of the elements that we will discuss are: image, language, character, voice, setting, story and revision. Come join in! This is going to be an exciting time to explore the possibilities of being a creative writer! 

224.004: Introduction to Creative Writing

MW 5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.  
Jason Thayer, thayerj@unm.edu

Over the course of the semester, we will read and discuss short fiction, memoir, and contemporary poetry that aim to illuminate the poignant moments that comprise life, ranging from the excruciating to the ecstatic.  We will use these stories to investigate how voice, character, rising action, setting, and image contribute to a successful piece of writing.  In addition, we will compose our own work in each of these genres, attempting to emulate the craft elements studied.  Finally, students will be given the opportunity to workshop their creative pieces, in attempt to make their work stronger.

224.005: Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.
Catherine Hubka, chubka@unm.edu

This course is an introduction to the basic craft elements, discipline, and terminology of Creative Writing. Students will practice the craft by reading, writing and critically engaging with their own and other work in the primary genres of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Students will establish writing goals and create a disciplined approach to their writing.

224.006: Introduction to Creative Writing

TR 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. 
Brenna Gomez, bng@unm.edu

In this class we will write about ourselves and our world in fiction, nonfiction, and poetry. We’ll read stories, essays, and poems that will push and challenge us. Genres and topics that will be explored include: magical realism, flash fiction, the lyric essay, race and gender, social justice, social media’s connection to creative writing, and more. Through our intensive reading and writing projects we’ll explore craft elements such as imagery, language, voice, setting, character, and more. This is a class for students who want to improve their creative writing skills or delve into creative writing for the first time. 

224.007: Introduction to Creative Writing

MWF 9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.  
Charles Wormhoudt, cwormhoudt@unm.edu

In this class we will be working in the three primary creative genres of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.  Through intensive reading as well as in- and out-of-class writing we will examine a number of craft elements important across all three genres in an attempt to implement them in our own works to make our writing more vivid, exciting, and effective. These elements will include image, language, character, voice, setting, story and revision, always keeping originality and excitement at the forefront of our minds.

224.009: Intro to Creative Writing

TR 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m. 
Lynn Wohlwend, lwohlwend@unm.edu 

In this class you will have the opportunity to explore writing in the creative genres of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction. Through intensive reading as well as in- and out-of-class writing, we will examine a number of craft elements important across all three genres in an attempt to implement them in our own works to make our writing more vivid, exciting, and effective. These elements will include image, language, character, voice, setting, story and revision, always keeping originality and excitement at the forefront of our minds. Here are just a few of the writers we’ll explore this semester: James Baldwin, Wanda Coleman, Junot Diaz, Joan Didion, Gary Jackson, James Joyce, Kuzhali Manickavel, Tillie Olsen, Wallace Stevens and many more.

240.001: Traditional Grammar

TR 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
Erin Fitzgerald, efitz01@unm.edu

This is a course in grammar, traditional, structural, and modern functionality from a historical to modern English period. The English language is a complex, rule-governed system that we use every day without having to think consciously about the intricacies of what we know when we “know how to speak English”.  In this course, we will unpack that knowledge, from how sounds are strung together to make words to how we take turns in conversation, from where new words come from to why Americans speak different dialects. This course covers the many levels of structure working in language, “from sounds to words to phrases to clauses to sentences” as well as the ways prescriptive and descriptive rules governing language and language change over time.

240.002: Traditional Grammar

MWF 10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.
Bethany Davila, bdavila@unm.edu

Most native speakers use English every day without having to think about the rules. In fact, people who have learned English as a foreign language often know the grammatical rules better than native speakers. However, as non-native speakers know well, English is a rule-governed system that changes over time. In this course, we will uncover the many levels of structure that make up the English language; we will investigate language changes; and we will examine common language attitudes and their effect on grammar. Course work will consist of frequent short assignments, short papers, a midterm, and a final.

248.001: The Medieval Side of Horror

MWF 2:00 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.
Jessica Troy, jtroy01@unm.edu

While vampires, zombies, magical beasts, and supernatural creatures are typical in horror films and literature, they are not always creations from the imaginations of modern writers and directors. Many horror stories have a medieval context and background which are often overlooked. In this class, students will analyze contemporary horror and discuss how medievalism plays a part in their creation as well as the ways in which the true medieval history has been altered, reworked, or obliterated for the modern audience’s enjoyment. Additionally, students will find their own examples of medieval-based horror, research the historical or literary context from which the film/book/show extracts its content, and investigate how the cinematic or literary piece affects the contemporary view of the medieval world. Titles to be used in class include, but are not limited to, Bram Stoker’s Dracula, Knight of the Dead, Black Death, and Army of Darkness.

249.001: Introduction to Studies in English

T 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.  
Sharon Warner, swarner@unm.edu

English 249 is a one-credit, 8 week class that brings together students, all of whom are majoring in English. This is a required course and must be taken before embarking on the major coursework. Students are introduced to the subfields of rhetoric and professional writing; creative writing; literary studies; and critical theory and cultural studies. Students will be introduced to the life of the department through class visits with faculty members; attendance at Departmental events; and a variety of readings and discussions. The final task will be to craft a letter of intent documenting their intended course of study.

249.002: Introduction to Studies in English

W 11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.  
Sharon Warner, swarner@unm.edu

English 249 is a one-credit, 8 week class that brings together students, all of whom are majoring in English. This is a required course and must be taken before embarking on the major coursework. Students are introduced to the subfields of rhetoric and professional writing; creative writing; literary studies; and critical theory and cultural studies. Students will be introduced to the life of the department through class visits with faculty members; attendance at Departmental events; and a variety of readings and discussions. The final task will be to craft a letter of intent documenting their intended course of study.

250.001: Literary Analysis

MWF 10:00 a.m. - 10:50 p.m. 
Feroza Jussawalla, fjussawa@unm.edu

This is a course in analyzing literature and studying the approaches to literary criticism. We will examine literary critical approaches past and present. In order to do so, we will use Stephen Bonnycastle’s In Search of Authority, a guide to the newer critical methods of race, class and gender, deconstruction and other contemporary critical methodologies. We will be using a Norton Anthology of English Literature (to be determined yet) volume that contains Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, Achebe’s Things Fall Apart, and other Postcolonial works, in order to prepare us to read Zadie Smith’s White Teeth as the longer, last novel. I am hoping and planning on taking students to hear Zadie Smith at the Lensic, in Santa Fe. This course should be of great interest to students interested in cross- cultural literary depictions. We will write short reaction response papers and a longer research paper. There will be fun in class reading quizzes to make sure we are all on the same page. Come enjoy the pleasure of reading literature.

250.002: Literary Textual Analysis

TR 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.  
Kadeshia Matthews, kadeshia@unm.edu 

This course introduces students to the study and analysis of literary and cultural texts. We will explore questions such as: What is literature? How has it been defined or understood in history? What is a work of art? How do we read literary texts? Why do we read literary texts? To answer these questions we will study a selection of texts from the major genres of Anglophone literature, poetry, drama, fiction, and film. Authors we will consider include W. Shakespeare, Cervantes, H. Melville, E. Dickinson, S. Beckett, R. Wright, Oscar Z. Acosta, Leslie M. Silko, C. McCarthy, Ana Castillo, the Coen brothers, and many others. In this course, not only will you learn how to read and write critically about literary texts, but you will learn how to use these skills to critique the cultural, social, political, and economic systems in which we live.

250.004: Analysis of Literature

TR 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.  
Kathleen Washburn, washburn@unm.edu

This course provides an introduction to the dynamic field of literary studies. Drawing on the broad rubric of missing persons, we will trace how literary texts explore the phenomenon of absence as the experience of loss, a welcome escape, an occasion for political protest, or a catalyst for transformation. From captivity and removal in the Americas to contemporary global migrations, we will investigate how literary texts employ familiar conventions while also producing new stories and new forms of meaning. We will take up poetry, fiction, drama, and film from various cultural and historical contexts; in addition, we will address significant movements in literary criticism and the effects of such interpretive frameworks on “how and perhaps why” we read literature. Finally, we will focus on how to design and execute literary analysis by refining key writing skills such as crafting an engaging and effective thesis, selecting and integrating textual evidence, and revising for clarity and precision. Course materials will include works by Sherman Alexie, Rebecca Harding Davis, Elizabeth Alexander, Cherrie Moraga, John Okada, and Luis Alberto Urrea. Course requirements include short response papers, a group presentation, active class participation, and a research project.

290.002: Introduction to Professional Writing

MWF 1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.
Julianne Newmark Engberg, newmark@unm.edu

This class will introduce you to methods of effectively communicating technical, professional, and business information to multiple audiences, in multiple modes. You will develop an understanding of theories of technical communication and will practice technical communication in many forms. With an eye constantly focused on audience needs and expectations, we will plan, organize, draft, revise, and edit documents and multimedia texts. We will learn that the content and appearance of each written document must be appropriate to the intended audience. This course introduces strategies of expository writing style, persuasive communication, and multimodal document design. You will also learn about ethical considerations in the workplace that impact technical and business communicators and the public. Assignments in this course will represent the most common genres of workplace writing, including resumes, informational graphics and data visualization, usability studies, memoranda, business letters, technical reports, proposals, and instructions. These projects are designed to help you create some initial materials for a portfolio you can use when looking for an internship or employment in the field.

292.001: Ancient World Literature

MWF 11 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.  
Doaa Omran, Domran@unm.edu

Beginning with the earliest literatures of the Ancient World, working up through the Medieval Period and moving into the Early Modern period, this course will explore some of the key works of the world’s literatures through the seventeenth century.  Placing memorable plays, poems, and works of fiction in their cultural and historical contexts, we will not only gain a greater understanding of the development of literature and literary traditions in China, Mesopotamia, Greece, Rome, Japan, Persia, Arabia, Europe, India, and the Americas, but we will gain a sense of history and a sense of the differences and similarities that shape the varieties of human experience across time and cultures.  As we marvel at powerful tales about love and war, heroic journeys, spiritual pilgrimages, courtly intrigue, and colonial contact we will be alert to the varying degrees that these works display the globalizing tendencies that have culminated in the richly diverse tapestry of the modern world.  Readings will include all or parts of such works as the Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, The Ramayana, The Aeneid, The Inferno, and The Tale of Genji; selections from the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures, Bhagavad Gita, and Quran; plays by Aeschylus, Kalidasa, and Shakespeare; poetry by Sappho, Catullus, Li Bai, Ono no Komachi, Petrarch, Ibn Hazm, and Farid ud-dun Attar; as well essays, letters and memoirs by Macchiavelli, Ibn Khaldun, Montaigne, and Columbus.  Requirements will include several short papers, quizzes, and a midterm and final examination.  

292.002: Early World Literature

TR 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Ann Lora D'Orazio, dorazio@unm.edu

This course will examine literature from the ancient world to the early modern period. We will analyze the idea of “world literature.” We will read, analyze, and discuss our primary works in historical context as well as the contexts of our contemporary globalized world while paying attention to the roles of translation, colonization, trade, and cross-cultural exchange. We will read all or parts of works such as The Epic of Gilgamesh, The Odyssey, The Ramayana, The Aeneid, The Inferno, The Popol Vuh, and The Tale of Genji; selections from a variety of sacred texts; plays, poems, essays, letters, and memoirs from Li Bai, Bartolome de las Casas, Cervantes, Ibn Hazm, Machiavelli, Montaigne, Shakespeare, Sappho, and others. Course requirements include a class presentation, reading quizzes, and essays. 

293.001: World Literatures: 17th Century through the Present

MWF 9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
Deborah Weagel, dweagel@unm.edu

This survey of world literature introduces students to some of the most influential literary works of the world from 1650 to the present. By following a chronological approach, students recognize interrelationships among peoples, nations, and cultures. Although they find universal themes among cultures from all over the globe, they also see that many communities have unique traditions and customs that give them a sense of individuality. Students learn the historical and cultural contexts of the international readings and engage in critical discussions regarding a variety of issues. They also analyze the readings in terms of literary themes, motifs, styles, and structures. Ideally, students better understand their own place, as well as that of others, in the global community.  In this course, students write five 3-page response papers, take three exams, have pop quizzes, and give two oral presentations. Please note that this is a reading-and writing-intensive course designed to help students think critically about and deeply engage with the assigned texts.  

293.002: World Literature 17C through Present

TR 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.  
Sarah L. Townsend, sltownse@unm.edu

In 1921, the English novelist E.M. Forster wrote, "The nations must understand one another, and quickly for the shrinkage of the globe is throwing them into one another's arms." In English 293, we will chart the longer history of Forster's claim by tracing global literature from the 17th century to the present. Our readings will traverse the world: we will read fiction, drama, poetry, and nonfiction from Europe and the Americas, Africa, Asia, and the Arabic world, focusing particularly on moments of contact and exchange. The course will be organized into a sequence of units that focus on major historical transformations: late feudalism and early capitalism; exploration and colonization; the Enlightenment; industrial revolutions; and global modernisms. By tracing through literature the global circulation of people, ideas, goods, money, institutions, and even feelings, we will gain a better sense of how literature provides desperately needed channels of understanding and diplomacy--in the seventeenth to nineteenth centuries, in Forster's time, and in our own.

295.001 Survey of Later English Literature

TR 09:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.  
Sarah L. Townsend, sltownse@unm.edu

This course will examine British literature from the 19th century to the present. We will take a surveyor's approach to the period, focusing on several transformative events in literary and cultural history and tracing their effects. Surveying (from the medieval Latin word supervidere, "oversee") will also form an object of our literary study as we follow British writing through the French Revolution, the Napoleonic wars, the late industrial revolution, and the rise and fall of the British Empire. We will see monarchs, statesmen, colonialists, and writers employ modes of surveying to map the nation and to define the modern self. We will also watch those on the margins borrow or resist such surveying in order to make their voices heard. English 295 will cover the major movements in 19th, 20th, and 21st-century British literature, from Romanticism to postcolonialism. The course will incorporate literature written in England, as well as many texts from Britain's colonies and former colonies that reimagine the shape, scope, and priorities of the modern British nation.

296.001: Earlier American Literature

MWF 11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m. 
Kathryn Wichelns, wichelns@unm.edu

In this course we will read key texts tracing the emergence of early notions of American personal and collective identity. Beginning with accounts from the seventeenth century, we will focus on ideas about class, race, sexuality and gender as articulated primarily through the divergent expectations and experiences of Europeans and the Native peoples of the Americas. These accounts, both by Native people and by English, French, and Spanish colonizers, reveal traces of the critical challenge that Native America presented to European notions of selfhood. Indian captivity narratives written by women living in Puritan New England, remind us of the complexity behind contemporary American ideas of national origin. Mary Prince's and Oloudah Equiano's accounts of their enslavement emphasize the global influences on emerging North American ideas about race, commerce, and human identity. Hannah Foster’s The Coquette, a bestseller when it was first published in 1797, suggests that post-Revolutionary American notions of nationality, sexual deviancy, and gender depend upon period-specific assumptions about race and class. Our course culminates in close readings of two of the most canonical works of popular fiction to emerge from this era. Washington Irving’s The Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon, Gent and James Fenimore Cooper’s The Last of the Mohicans articulate ambivalent responses to shifting mores. An emphasis on historical and political context will enable us to explore the extraordinary differences among these textual representations, and will allow us better to understand the ways that this tumultuous time inaugurates the ideological struggles of the nineteenth century.

297.001: Later American Literature

-Online
Daniel Worden, dworden@unm.edu

This course surveys U.S. literary history from 1865 to the present. Over the course of the semester, we will study works from major styles, movements, and forms in American literature, including regionalism, realism, naturalism, modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, confessional poetry, the Beat movement, postmodernism, and contemporary writing. American literary history is a contested terrain, and accordingly, this course is designed to foreground the central themes, problems, and concerns of American literature. We will devote particular attention to the question of the "individual" in American literature and the relation of literature to economics, politics, and society. This course is fully online. Requirements include 2 short essays, regular discussion board posts, and annotation assignments.

297.002: Later American Literature

MWF 1:00 p.m. – 1:50 p.m.
Bernadine Hernandez, berna18@unm.edu

In this course, we will survey the development of U.S. literary history from the end of the civil war (1865) to the present as we examine a diverse scope of authors and major literary movements, styles, and forms in the development of the nation. We will be looking at the major literary movements and consider texts in the context of realism, naturalism, regionalism, modernism, the Harlem Renaissance postmodernism, and the contemporary novel. Simultaneously, as we attempt to understand the characteristic and importance of each movement, we will also examine that many authors and texts resist easy categorization and what literary innovations they use to comment and respond to a changing nation. Additionally, we will look at how processes of differentiation, such as race, class, gender, and sexuality manifested throughout American history. Over the course of the semester, we will be supplementing and complementing our readings and discussions of later American literature in two ways: first, to think about this literature within a larger cultural context, we will look at it alongside other media from the period, including film, music, and art. Additionally, we will incorporate digital tools for literary and cultural study as a way of interpreting American literature of this period. Requirements: active participation and attendance, two short essays, a midterm and a final exam.

304.001: The Bible as Literature

TR 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.  
Janet Gaines, jhgaines@unm.edu

The Bible contains some of the most powerful stories of all time. This course will explore the literary/critical possibilities for reading biblical sagas of love and war, faith and doubt, salvation and degradation. We will examine literary elements of biblical tales, determine how these narratives have shaped our culture, and study what they reveal about our world. Units of study include heroic narratives, history of the Davidic monarchy, wisdom literature and poetry, prophetic literature, the letter as literature, and apocalyptic literature. Mid-term, final, and one analytical or creative seven-page paper.

305.001: Mythology

MWF 1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.  
Nicholas Schwartz, nschwar@unm.edu

This course is designed to introduce students to a variety of mythological traditions that are most necessary to learn and recognize for the study of American and British literature and culture. As such, our focus will be “primarily but not only” on the Western mythologies which most often exerted a major influence on these literatures and cultures. This does not mean, however, that we will spend all of our time reading those myths which feature prominently in Ancient Greek and Roman Literatures. The scope of this course is broad, both geographically and temporally speaking. We will start with the Ancient Sumerian Gilgamesh. From there we will touch base with the Judeo-Christian Bible, Ancient Greece and Rome, and Medieval England, amongst others. Students will not only develop a valuable familiarity with these various mythological traditions, but they will also be exposed to a number of different ways of reading and analyzing them.

308.001: The Jewish Experience in America

TR 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.  
Janet Gaines, jhgaines@unm.edu

This course examines works by the most thought-provoking American Jewish writers, including Nobel and Pulitzer Prize winners Isaac Singer, Bernard Malamud, Saul Bellow, Art Spiegelman, Woody Allen, and others. Units of study include American Views on European Roots, the Immigrant Experience, the Holocaust, and Post-WWII America. Required readings includes short stories, novels, and a graphic novel. Mid-term, final, one seven-page paper.

315.001: Comics & Graphic Novels

-Online
Daniel Worden, dworden@unm.edu

Comics are a major form of storytelling in modern culture, from early strips like The Yellow Kid and Little Orphan Annie to contemporary, award-winning works such as Alison Bechdel's Fun Home and Art Spiegelman's Maus. In this course, we will study the history of comics, from newspapers strips and superhero books to the canonization of the contemporary "graphic novel," as well as the unique structure and style of the comics form. Along with comics themselves, we will read critical essays from the emerging field of comics studies that seek to develop unique methods for the interpretation of comics as a literary and visual form. Over the course of the semester, we will explore how to read, interpret, and contextualize comics. More particularly, we will focus on comics history and the comics form in the first half of the semester, and in the second half of the semester, we will read a number of contemporary graphic narratives and develop our own accounts of contemporary comics art and culture. Readings will include graphic narratives such as Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons' Watchmen, Alison Bechdel's Fun Home, Joe Sacco's Palestine, Eleanor Davis's How to Be Happy, and Art Spiegelman's Maus, as well as selections from ongoing comics series, including The Avengers, Batgirl, Hellboy, Ms. Marvel, Pretty Deadly, Sex Criminals, Spider-Man, Superman, and The Uncanny X-Men. This course is fully online. Requirements include an online presentation, regular discussion board posts, 2 short essays, and one final essay.

315.002: Rewriting Slavery

MWF 9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
Kadeshia Matthews, kadeshia@unm.edu

Slavery was surely the most divisive and vexing issue confronting the United States before 1865. Whether or not (and how) to abolish slavery was perhaps the primary issue, but behind this question lay many others whose answers were equally contested. What was the nature of slavery as an institution? What were its effects on the enslaved and the enslaver? What did the persistence of slavery say abou the American experiment and American character? Though the 13th Amendment abolished slavery in the United States, at least in theory, answers to these and similar questions continue to be contested as the country has moved from reconciliation to world power to lone superpower and "defender of freedom" around the world. Reading literary, historiographic and visual texts about slavery from the antebellum era to the present, we will examine the ways in which slavery has been constructed and remembered in both the popular and scholarly imagination and how particular texts intervene in the ongoing debates about the place and meanings of slavery, race and racism in and to American life and culture. Authors will include Frederick Douglass, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Stanley Elkins, Eugene Genovese, Octavia Butler, and Toni Morrison. Format: discussion. Requirements: consistent, substantive participation in class and online discussions, an in-class presentation and a research essay of 10-12 pages. 

315.004: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Literature: The Outlaw and the Outlawed in American Literature

-Online
Ying Xu, yingxu@unm.edu

Course Description: The course examines the nature, function, and context of the outlaw and the outlawed (people, spaces, and practices) and their literary representations in American literature. With a brief introduction to early outlawry in American history, the course focuses mainly on nineteenth-century and twentieth-century texts and writers. We will study the transcultural, transgendered and interdisciplinary manifestations and the different literary, political, socio-historical, and media contexts in which the outlawed may be encountered and represented. Topics covered include western stories, frontier conflicts, male subjectivity, sexuality, homosexuality, immigration acts, bodies of law and the outlawed bodies, and passing and identity negotiation. On completing the course, the student will have learned to do literary analyses by applying multiple approaches and will be able to read and write about the outlaws and the representations of the outlaws critically and analytically, demonstrating an understanding of the authors and their work covered in the course in their cultural, historical, and biographical contexts. Requirements include two 6-7-page major papers (typed, double space, no larger than 12 font and usual margins); five short essays; discussion assignments; and a final exam.

320.001: Advanced Expository Writing - The Construction and Power of Meaning

TR 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.  
Erin Lebacqz, lebacqze@unm.edu 

This course will explore the way communication and rhetoric (strategized, intentional, motivated communication in written, oral, or visual form) are used to create meaning, customs, social norms, and power stratification in societies and subcultures. Students will have the opportunity to both analyze how meaning is constructed and later used, and to employ rhetoric in their own writing towards this end. We’ll study the role of rhetoric and meaning in the creation of norms in cultures and subcultures, rhetoric’s role in the centralization of power within certain entities, and the use of rhetoric and meaning by groups seeking to subvert the power structure. Students will also study a local subculture ethnographically, study the language and rhetoric used by this group towards their own social norms, and write for, and about, this audience. 

321.001: Intermediate Creative Writing - Fiction

MW 4:00 p.m. - 5:15 p.m.  
Jack Trujillo, jacktru@unm.edu

This is a craft-based class in short literary fiction. The focus of our work is one the specific elements of craft that writers (that’s you) use to construct stories and an examination, using your own writing and the writing of others, of how those craft elements can be manipulated to achieve different narrative ends. The first half of the semester is spent attacking in multiple ways the first short story you write: changing point of view, starting the story at an entirely new place, or removing back story, for example. The second half of the semester is spent workshopping a second story written for the class. Both stories have specific limitations and rules. Class requires much writing, much reading, two complete stories, a live reading review, a craft review of a collection of short fiction and written critiques of each of your fellow student’s stories. Texts are Deepening Fiction by Sarah Stone and Ron Nyren and a collection of short fiction drawn from a short list.  

321.002: Intermediate Creative Writing - Fiction

TR 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.
Jack Trujillo, jacktru@unm.edu

This is a craft-based class in short literary fiction. The focus of our work is one the specific elements of craft that writers (that’s you) use to construct stories and an examination, using your own writing and the writing of others, of how those craft elements can be manipulated to achieve different narrative ends. The first half of the semester is spent attacking in multiple ways the first short story you write: changing point of view, starting the story at an entirely new place, or removing back story, for example. The second half of the semester is spent workshopping a second story written for the class. Both stories have specific limitations and rules. Class requires much writing, much reading, two complete stories, a live reading review, a craft review of a collection of short fiction and written critiques of each of your fellow student’s stories. Texts are Deepening Fiction by Sarah Stone and Ron Nyren and a collection of short fiction drawn from a short list.

322.001: Intermediate Creative Writing - Poetry

TR 11:00 a.m. - 12:15 p.m.  
Michelle Brooks, mbrooksteaching@gmail.com

We will read contemporary poetry. Students will be expected to submit their poetry for workshop.

323.002: Intermediate Creative Writing - Nonfiction

TR 3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.  
Lisa Chavez, ldchavez@unm.edu

This is an intermediate level creative writing class in creative nonfiction, a wide-ranging genre that includes memoir, personal essay, literary journalism and the lyric essay, among others.  Though we will likely focus on memoir, you will be introduced to a variety of different types of essays, and you will learn how to craft compelling scenes and reflection, as well as learn some of the unique ethical challenges of writing and discussing this genre.   In addition to writing, we will read a lot, both work by established writers and work generated in the class.

323.003: Intermediate Creative Writing - Nonfiction

TR 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.
Andrew Bourelle, abourelle@unm.edu

In this course, you will study creative nonfiction, learning about the genre both as a reader and a writer. You will read numerous nonfiction essays and excerpts from books, covering a wide variety of nonfiction subgenres: memoir, personal essay, literary journalism, nature writing, and more. You will also write nonfiction and participate in peer workshops where you read and respond to your classmates’ writing. From this class, you should develop a clear understanding of the genre of nonfiction, as well as develop skills of thinking critically about both your own and others’ writing. 

324.003: Introduction to Screenwriting

T 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. 
Matthew McDuffie, mcduffie@unm.edu

An introduction to the art and craft of narrative screenwriting.

347.001: Viking Mythology

TR 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.  
Nicholas Schwartz, nschwar@unm.edu

This course is designed to comprehensively introduce students to Viking Mythology. It will cover Norse ideas about the creation of the world, the end of the world, and pretty much everything in between. Students should expect to read about Odin, Thor, Loki, and a host of other characters not so well-known today. In addition these important mythological features, we will read accounts of important events, like the conversion to Christianity. Texts include, but are not limited to, The Elder Edda, Snorri Sturluson’s Prose Edda, and The Saga of the Volsungs. All primary sources will be read in English translation. Additionally, students will learn about the culture(s) that produced these wonderful stories and their specific literary conventions. This course will foster a valuable familiarity with an important mythological tradition and expose students to a variety of methods of reading its stories. 

349.001: From Beowulf to Arthur

MWF 9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.  
Lisa Myers, myersl@unm.edu

This course is designed as an introductory survey to the literary works produced in England in the Middle Ages, c. 700-1500. While most texts will be read in Modern English translations, class lectures will provide some background on the development of the English language. The class will focus on both the specialized terminology and literary devices particular to medieval English texts as well as the cultural, social and political factors that influenced the development of English literature. Readings will introduce students to a wide variety of medieval genres and will include epic, lyric poetry, romance, mystical revelation and outlaw tale as illustrated in such works as Beowulf, The Dream of the Rood, Sir Orfeo, The Showings of Julian of Norwich and the Rhymes of Robin Hood.

351.001: Chaucer: The Canterbury Tales

MWF 10:00 a.m. - 10:50 a.m.  
Nicholas Schwartz, nschwar@unm.edu

This course focuses on The Canterbury Tales, the final work and masterpiece of Geoffrey Chaucer, one of the greatest and most important writers in English. A mix of the bawdy and the chaste, the sacred and the profane, the high- and the low-class, amongst other dichotomies, Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales is a work that provides its readers with a host of personalities, literary conventions, styles, and much, much more. All primary texts will be read in Chaucer’s Middle English, though students do not need to have any experience with the language in order to take this course. Chaucer wrote during the fourteenth century, a time of great tumult, including famine, plague, political uprising, and religious rebellion. We will consider the Canterbury Tales in light of this complicated historical context while also paying attention to the long and rich history of scholarly criticism on the Tales. Coursework and assignments designed to develop knowledge of the conventions of medieval English poetry, a competence in Middle English, and to recognize Chaucer’s contributions to English language and literature.

352.001: Early Shakespeare

MWF 12:00 p.m. - 12:50 p.m.  
Lisa Myers, myersl@unm.edu

This course covers the Elizabethan-era drama and poetry of William Shakespeare who is considered to be one of the greatest, if not the greatest, writer in the English language. In addition to focused discussions of plays and poetry, the course will also examine the literary and cultural background of Early Modern England and the ways in which this climate influenced Shakespeare’s development as a dramatist and poet. Assignments will include two papers and a multi-modal project. Texts to be read include: The Comedy of Errors, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, The Tragedy of Richard III, The Life of King Henry V, Venus and Adonis, Hamlet, Titus Andronicus and Selected Sonnets.

352.010: Early Shakespeare

-Online
Karra Shimabukuro, kshimabukuro@unm.edu

This online class is a survey of Shakespeare’s Elizabethan-era drama and poetry (up through 1603 when she died, and it became the Jacobean period when James became king). This includes such works as A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Twelfth Night, Hamlet, Titus Andronicus, and The Merchant of Venice as well as supplemental works where appropriate and secondary sources that explain and explore commonly discussed themes. Throughout the course then you will learn to identify and describe dramatic structure, characterization, poetics and a variety of themes in their historical context. We will focus not only on analyzing the texts, but understanding the historical and cultural moments they represent. This is an online course which operates asynchronously, which means we will not all be only at the same time, but we will all work off of the weekly schedule. Online course require your attention and participation, as well as careful reading of all the materials in the course.

353.001: Later Shakespeare

TR 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
Yulia Ryzhik, yryzhik@unm.edu

In this course we will read eight plays from the second half of Shakespeare's career as a playwright, roughly from 1603 to 1611. We will encounter Shakespeare at the height of his artistic powers, yet constantly challenging himself to grow and learn from one play to the next, whether by setting up new formal problems or by exploring new psychological depths and heights. Beginning with Twelfth Night, the last of Shakespeare's "festive" comedies, we will delve into the troubled world of Measure for Measure and Troilus and Cressida, with their pervasive sense of malaise in the state and its people, and of the great tragedies such as Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth, which elevate fundamentally human disasters to a cosmic scale, before concluding with the haunting romances The Winter's Tale and The Tempest. The main goals of this course are for students to become familiar with each of the plays individually, to learn to appreciate complex dramatic structures and the rich interplay between language and performed action, to understand the plays' literary, historical, and material contexts, and to grapple passionately and analytically with recurring issues such as individual consciousness and conscience, family and relationships, good and bad government, war and violence, sexuality and race, magic and imagination. Part of achieving these goals is a thorough commitment to learning various methods of literary analysis and improving critical reading and writing skills.

353.002: Later Shakespeare

TR 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.
Gerard Lavin, glavin@unm.edu

In this course we will read eight plays from the second half of Shakespeare's career as a playwright, roughly from 1603 to 1611. We will encounter Shakespeare at the height of his artistic powers, yet constantly challenging himself to grow and learn from one play to the next, whether by setting up new formal problems or by exploring new psychological depths and heights. Beginning with Twelfth Night, the last of Shakespeare's "festive" comedies, we will delve into the troubled world of Measure for Measure and Troilus and Cressida, with their pervasive sense of malaise in the state and its people, and of the great tragedies such as Othello, King Lear, and Macbeth, which elevate fundamentally human disasters to a cosmic scale, before concluding with the haunting romances The Winter's Tale and The Tempest. The main goals of this course are for students to become familiar with each of the plays individually, to learn to appreciate complex dramatic structures and the rich interplay between language and performed action, to understand the plays' literary, historical, and material contexts, and to grapple passionately and analytically with recurring issues such as individual consciousness and conscience, family and relationships, good and bad government, war and violence, sexuality and race, magic and imagination. Part of achieving these goals is a thorough commitment to learning various methods of literary analysis and improving critical reading and writing skills.

355.001: Survey of Enlightenment

TR 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.  
Carolyn Woodward, writecjw@gmail.com

The Enlightenment: Wondrous things upon the earth? With microscope and telescope, in drops of water, across oceans, and in the expanse of the heavens, people marveled at a plurality of revealed worlds. Shocking ideas were formulated and published during this time, sometimes at people’s peril as they challenged not only received opinion but sometimes church and government authorities in philosophical treatises, clandestine literature, visual narrative, travel writing, newspapers, dictionaries and encyclopedias, and the novel. Major figures include John Locke, Mary Wortley Montagu, the naturalist Gilbert White, Voltaire, and Jean-Jacques Rousseau. We’ll read selections from writers of African origins living in London, North America, and the Caribbean, as well. The semester will close with Jane Austen’s extended thought experiment on reason and passion in her novel Sense & Sensibility.

360.001: Salman Rushdie

MWF 2:00 p.m. - 2:50 p.m.  
Feroza Jussawalla, fjussawa@unm.edu

This course is in honor of the publication of Salman Rushdie’s newest fairy tale novel, Two Years Eight Months and Twenty Eight Nights. It seems that by setting his story in the land of djinns, Rushdie is using Magic Realism to tell the story of his exile as he did in Haroun and the Sea of Stories. It also recalls his first book Grimus. We will read these three books together at the beginning of the course and then move on to the most controversial book of the century, The Satanic Verses. This book was the cause of the “fatwa” or ban against Rushdie and tells the story of a fictionalized Prophet Mohammed in a magic realistic manner. After this we will read Rushdie’s Midnights’ Children, a political satire of the history of India. Students will be asked to write short 500 word essays on each novel and one long research paper at the end of the semester. Graduate students are invited to take this class as an independent study, attend sessions with the undergraduates and write a longer, more extended research paper. This is a course that offers you the opportunity to read and enjoy the works of one of the greatest English language writers of the century.

360.002: The Shelleys and Byron

TR 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Gary Harrison, garyh@unm.edu

In the summer of 1816, Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Wollstonecraft Godwin Shelley, and Mary’s half-sister Claire Clairmont visited Lord Byron who was leasing the Villa Diodati overlooking Lake Geneva. It was at there in June 1816 that Mary Shelley penned her myth-making novel about the pale student of unhallowed arts Victor Frankenstein and his creature. Sensationalized in films such as Ivan Passer’s Haunted Summer (1988) and Ken Russell’s Gothic (1986), this notorious coterie of literary rebels inspired each other with late night readings of German ghost stories, heady conversations about the Prometheus myth and classic Greek tragedy, and speculative reflections upon revolutionary politics and the new electro-chemistry of Humphrey Davy and Luigi Galvani. As Mary Shelley began Frankenstein, Byron was finishing Canto 3 of Childe Harold's Pilgrimage, and Percy was working on his brilliant Hymn to Intellectual Beauty, an encomium to an unseen force he calls the Spirit of Beauty. In this course we’ll weave together the biographical, intellectual, and poetic filaments that spurred the radical imagination of these writers ensconced near Lake Geneva in what became known as the year without a summer caused by a number of volcanic eruptions around the world. In addition to the works named above, readings will include other key works by the Shelleys and Byron, including Mathilda, The Cenci, Prometheus Unbound, and Manfred.

388.002: SW Literature and Culture

MWF 9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.
Melina Vizcaino-Aleman, mviz@unm.edu

New Mexico and the greater Southwest has long been a contested region, and southwestern literature, film, and art provide rich accounts of the beauty, borders, communities, and violence that have given the Southwest such a unique history and arts culture. In this course, we will explore how New Mexico and the greater Southwest have played prominent roles in 20th-century art, literature, and film. The course will also make use of some of the University of New Mexico’s unique collections of art and literature at the Center for Southwest Research and the University Art Museum, and we will develop ways to think about the Southwest through the region’s long history, rich resources, and its contemporary urban, suburban, and rural environments.

413.001: Science, Medical, & Environmental Writing

T 4:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.
Julianne Newmark Engberg, newmark@unm.edu

ENGL 413 will focus on Environmental and Scientific writing and will be a project-based course, meaning that students will be designing texts and multi-media presentations around a subject of their choosing, a subject currently of interest to environmentalists, scientists, and the public (and of course to environmental scientists and to public intellectuals, citizens, and politicians).  We will examine the tactics and structures of popular and field-specific scientific and environmental writing and we will consider how these texts (audio, print-based, film) make the arguments they make (what their *rhetorical appeals* are).  We will engage with the texts we read in many forms, including via letters to the editor, article critiques, "popular science" essays, scientific abstracts, and more.

414.001: Documentation

MWF 2:00 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.  
Julianne Newmark Engberg, newmark@unm.edu

This course in advanced technical communication will serve a particular client this semester - “the Xchanges electronic journal” and the documents you will produce will relate to the review, revision, correspondence, and production of two issues of the journal. This course will prepare you to write technical documents in professional and organizational contexts (business, government, nonprofit agencies), and your work with the Xchanges journal will model the document-creation practices common in technical writing careers. Before embarking on work related to our specific journal, the first part of the semester will be dedicated to learning what technical writers and editors do and what skills they need. We will also learn about other tasks in the content development process, such as creating visual content, production editing, and indexing. The course will require students to create activity reports, to learn to use a Content Management System (CMS), to analyze and edit web content, to create procedures manuals, and to design and write manuals, tutorials, and white papers. Additional activities will includes participating in Skype workshops with online journal editors from other universities, researching best practices in ejournal production, and creating documentation for future students and Xchanges ejournal stakeholders. 

415.001: Publishing

T 5:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
David Dunaway, dunaway@unm.edu

This course in creative nonfiction introduces students to the publishing industry, in the U.S. and internationally, from the multiple perspectives of the author, the editor, the agent, and the publisher. Our primary goal is to provide a successful strategy for publishing your work in journals, magazines, books, and on the internet. Our secondary goal is to prepare an informed community of writers, able to understand contracts, industry procedures, and publishing’s cultural significance.

The class begins with a survey of current trends, then moves to a history of publishing in the U.S.; followed by an overview of ownership and control in the modern era. We discuss procedures and standards for submissions of articles and book proposals to publishers of literary, scholarly, technical, and trade (general-adult) materials. We examine in detail the roles of editors and agents in manuscripts—with an emphasis on the increasing digitization (e-books) and globalization of publishing/media activities. Any writer interested in these topics is welcome to join us. There are no exams. 

417.001: Editing

MWF 1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.  
Stephen Benz, sbenz@unm.edu

This course focuses on editing as a professional skill. Along with practicing advanced copyediting skills, you will learn about "information design": the creation of documents that are complete, accurate, correct, comprehensible, usable, and appropriate for readers. Because editors must often be responsible for a document from its inception to its presentation as a finished product, you will also learn about layout and document design, as well as contemporary production processes. Successful completion of this course will provide you with the foundation necessary for a future career in the field.

418.001: World Changing Proposals

MWF 12:00 p.m. – 12:50 p.m.
Dianne Bechtel, di4srv@unm.edu

This course is developed to work with the Innovation Academy’s mission to inspire and cultivate creativity and entrepreneurship. The course targets the critical thinking, problem-solving, and writing skills needed to create a viable business plan and proposal or grant proposal. The topic of the semester-long project will be identified at the beginning of the term. Students will identify and define a problem in the community, study its causes and effects, do a quantitative study, and work on a real world solution to the problem. This entails establishing credibility through background research on beneficiaries and possible funders. Learning opportunities include seminar style discussions to locate and critique innovative ideas, examinations of case studies, guest speakers, and in-class writing and reviews of peer proposals. Though a partnership with a real business or funding entity is desired, the ultimate goal is to have a well-constructed and fully functional document that the student can take to a bank, business, or funder for immediate consideration. 

420.002: Stylistics Analysis

TR 8:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m.  
Jerome Shea, jshea@unm.edu

Stylistic Analysis is a wide ranging course that tries to find out what makes for good prose (and what makes for wretched prose). We will study periodic and running sentences, noun style and verb style, parataxis and hypotaxis. We will ponder such questions as "What do we mean by 'voice'?"; "What assumptions do we bring to prose that we don't bring to poetry?"; and "What do we mean by 'high style' and 'low style'?" We will question whether prose is transparent or opaque, and what the ramifications of that are. Five or six short papers, no exams.

420.003: Craft of Literary Journalism

MWF 11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.  
Stephen Benz, sbenz@unm.edu

This special topics course focuses on the craft of literary journalism. We will study the work of literary journalists such as Joan Didion, Tom Wolfe, and Susan Orlean. We will also read interviews and essays in which accomplished literary journalists discuss the work that they do and how they do it. Finally, through short exercises and longer writing assignments, we will work on writing our own pieces of literary journalism. The goal of the course is to explore the genre of literary journalism, its history, its precursors, its conventions, and its practitioners. We’ll learn about the origins of literary journalism, what it tries to do, and what forms it takes. Most important of all, we will learn how to write magazine-style articles using the storytelling techniques that make literary journalism such an appealing genre for readers and writers.

421.002: Advanced Creative Writing Fiction

TR 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.  
Michelle Brooks, mbrooksteaching@gmail.com

We will focus on reading and writing contemporary fiction. Students will be expected to present short stories for workshop.

421.010: Advanced Fiction

Online -
Julie Shigekuni, jshig@unm.edu

Strong content arises out of identifying and carefully nurturing each layer of a story. In this advanced fiction workshop you will identify, isolate, and combine elements of craft used to generate story. I’m particularly interested in how the observed life combines with imagination in fiction. It's a given that what we experience affects our stories, but how to engage the imagination? Participants will critique stories written by workshop participants and read and analyze the work of a range of contemporary authors.

422.001: Advanced Poetry Writing

TR 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.  
Luci Tapahonso, Tapahonso@unm.edu

As a Creative Writing major, you understand that poetry is a part of our daily lives and indeed, it is a part of all people’s lives. This semester we will consider closely the import of this statement as it relates to our own writing as well as that of selected writers. We will take up questions concerning the poetics, theories, influences, politics, and techniques of several contemporary American poets. In addition to close readings and careful critiques of your peer’s work, each student will lead a discussion on an assigned poet.  An original poem is due every other week and students will read his/her work at a public reading at the semester’s end.  

423.001: Advanced Creative Writing - Nonfiction

TR 5:00 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.
Lisa Chavez, ldchavez@unm.edu

This is an advanced creative writing workshop in creative nonfiction.  This class presupposes a certain understanding of the genre: i.e. at least a basic understanding of the use scene and dialogue and reflection.  Our goals in this course will be to hone craft skills, try out new techniques in exercises, and practice revision skills.  While we will read the work of published authors and explore the variety of types of essays that fall into the category of creative nonfiction, we will primarily focus on workshopping student work.

424.001: Creative Writing Workshop - Scriptwriting

R 5:00 p.m. - 8:00:p.m. 
Matthew McDuffie, mcduffie@unm.edu

Advanced screenwriting. A workshop for short and long form narrative film writing.

441.001: English Grammars

MWF 11:00 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.  
Bethany Davila, bdavila@unm.edu

Studying grammar doesn‘t have to be boring! This course helps students approach the study of grammar from different perspectives, all while attending to language politics, language attitudes, and language use. Projects include analyzing parts of speech, phrases, and constituents by representing sentences in phrase trees and sentence diagrams, considering language in use as well as the rules that govern our use, and examining our own and others’ academic writing using corpus linguistics.

444.002: Tutoring Practicum

MWF 9:00 a.m. – 9:50 p.m.
Erin Lebacqz, lebacqze@unm.edu

Tutoring Practicum students learn to provide effective feedback to newer writers and develop their own skill set as tutors and potentially as future teachers, writers, or professional communicators. The class readings focus on education and the writing process, helping us think about how students draft their papers and what we can do to support their development of their writing and their education. English 444 students are placed in an online English 110 or 120 class, in which they provide revision support to 110 and 120 students. The course requires a final portfolio showcasing the student's work as a tutor and analytic thinker.

448.001: Beowulf & Other Topics

TR 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.  
Jonathan Davis-Secord, jwds@unm.edu

Beowulf is the most celebrated and studied Old English poem, yet it remains ambiguous and contested. Modern scholars continue to scrutinize difficult points in the text and wrestle over approaches to the poem. This course will be devoted to a close reading of Beowulf in the original Old English, coupled with pertinent scholarship on specific points in the poem along the way. We will explore the roles of women in the text, the meanings of the monsters, the patterns of gift-giving, the linguistic intricacies of the text, and many other topics. Students will prepare translations of the poem, read secondary literature, and write a critical research paper for the semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 447/547 or the equivalent.

451.001: T: Medieval Latin

TR 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.  
Jonathan Davis-Secord, jwds@unm.edu

The phrase medieval Latin covers an amazingly wide array of time periods, genres, and geographical locations. It applies to philosophical treatises written in Italy in the fifth century, letters written in northern Europe in the ninth century, and saints’ lives written in England in the fifteenth century. As a result of this abundance, this course will touch upon only a small number of important texts and authors from the medieval period. We will concentrate on short sections of these texts, spending several weeks with each in order for students to become familiar with major texts and authors of Medieval Latin and increase their facility with Latin generally and their knowledge of the distinguishing features of Medieval Latin specifically. Prerequisite: LATN 102 or equivalent.

457.001: Fragmentation: Dickens, the Guillotine, and Film

TR 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.  
Gail Houston, ghouston@unm.edu

A metonym for the French Revolution (FR), the guillotine caused a cut in history reflected in the later creation of film. Fragmentation is at the heart of filmmaking (editing) and the FR (physical and mental fragmentation of consciousness and self). Dickens intuits these cuts aesthetically and theoretically by illustrating identity, history, and consciousness as fragmented. First used in 1792, the guillotine and the horrific and heroic events it signified were central to magic lantern shows and phantasmagorias that preceded and led to filmmaking. Scholarship has made the connection between representations of the French Revolution and the guillotine in the new popular entertainments of the magic lantern, panorama, and phantasmagorias, all of which used developing scientific principles on optics (Sophie Thomas). Scholarship has also noted Dickens’ aesthetic filmic qualities (writing that is similar to the screenplay form and parallel storytelling) (Grahame Smith, Sergei Eisenstein, D. W. Griffith). No scholarship has linked the magic lantern, the fragmented optics these produce, and the fragmented subjectivity created by the French Revolution with Dickens’ tendency to use the imagery of cut heads and fragmented, schizophrenic selves in his novels, in particular in Tale of Two Cities. By bringing these seemingly disparate historical, aesthetic, political threads together, I demonstrate that the new democratic understanding of individual identity as autonomous, agentic, and free (as opposed to the hierarchical trajectory of monarchy that only recognized the individual identity of the king) is ironically based on the cutting of the head from the body. I further demonstrate that this subjectivity was necessary and inherent to the development of the new artistic and industrial medium of film. We will examine phantasmagorias, magic lanterns, and the basics of film production, optics and fragmentation. We will also read Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution, upon which Tale of Two Cities is based and other Dickens novels and film versions.

461.001: American Romanticism

MWF 2:00 p.m. – 2:50 p.m.  
Jesse Aleman, jman@unm.edu

This course understands the American renaissance broadly as a historical moment during the mid-nineteenth-century that saw radical changes in everything from literature and print culture to domesticity and democracy. It was a time teeming with excitement and energy for the United States, as it developed into a national power and self-consciously struggled to generate its own national literature. Normally, we associate this era with canonical authors, such as Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, and Whitman, but the writings of marginal authors, such as Douglass, Fuller, Poe, and Lippard, demonstrate the diversity of American literature that boomed between the 1830s to the 1850s. This course will thus survey and analyze the key texts and authors of mid-nineteenth-century American literature. It will focus on major movements such as transcendentalism and romanticism; major literary forms such as essays and novels; and major socio-historical factors such as Indian removal, slavery, domesticity, and the rise of market capitalism and industry, but we’ll also read and discuss lesser-known writings and authors to experience the variety of texts that the American renaissance fostered and fueled in the years preceding the U.S. Civil War.

464.001: 20th Century Indigenous Literature

TR 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.  
Kathleen Washburn, washburn@unm.edu

In this course, we will investigate Native American and First Nations poetry, nonfiction, and fiction from the early twentieth century alongside contemporary novels and films that invoke the so-called assimilation era. We will encounter Native soldiers from World War I, students from Indian boarding schools, allotment agents, and characters from Hollywood westerns in texts that chart the creative possibilities and critical stakes for representing modern indigenous communities. In turn, by tracing the ways in which discourses about sovereign territory and citizenship rights from the early twentieth century continue to inflect Native American literature and film today, we will engage in debates about literary adaptation and innovation, indigenous intellectual history, and the ethics and aesthetics of cultural production. Course materials will include E. Pauline Johnson’s Tekahionwake, Laura Cornelius Kellogg’s Our Democracy, Gerald Vizenor’s Blue Ravens, Louise Erdrich’s Tracks, and Thomas King’s Green Grass, Running Water

465.002: Chicano/a Literature

MWF 10:00 a.m. – 10:50 a.m.  
Bernadine Hernandez, berna18@unm.edu

This advanced study of Chicano/a literature will chart the emergence and aftermath of the literature that historically evolved out of the Civil Rights movement, a time classified as solidifying a Chicano/a cultural consciousness.  However, we will be troubling this historical construction with examination of recovered texts from the nineteenth and early twentieth-centuries that explore early definitions, literary techniques, and genres of Chicano/a literature.  This course will focus on form (experimental and other), literary technique, and genre as a method to think through discursive and material crisis and categorization of Chicanos/as.  Ending with the contemporary Chicana postmodern novel and sci-fi, you will come to have a robust understanding of the particular innovative literary strategies in relation to overall aesthetics, culture, and voice of the literature.  Some of the text we will be reading will be Oscar Zeta Acosta’s Revolt of the Cockroach People, Ron Arias’ Road to Tamazunchale, Cherr­e Moraga’s Hero and Saints, Rudolfo Anaya’s Alburquerque, Ana Castillo’s Give It to Me, and Rosaura Sanchez’s and Beatrice Pita’s Lunar Braceros.   We will also examine the literature alongside film, visual culture, and theory to get a better understanding of the texts.  Requirements: attendance and participation, two essays, a midterm, and a final exam. 

466.001: African American Literature

TR 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m. 
Finnie Coleman, coleman@unm.edu

In this course we will conduct a broad survey of African American literature from the poetry and slave narratives in Colonial and Antebellum America to short fiction and novels produced since the close of the Black Arts Movement. Along the way we will pay close attention to the periodization of African American literature and the literary conventions and rhetorical strategies that bind these periods together to form such a vibrant literary tradition. When possible we will explore cinematic representations and stage productions of the literature that we are reading. We will close our course with an exploration of Toni Morrison’s most recent fiction.

473.001: Postmodernism

TR 9:30 a.m. - 10:45 a.m.  
Scarlett Higgins, shiggins@unm.edu

This course will serve as an introduction to the literature (and films) of postmodernity. We will look at the concept of postmodernism from three different perspectives: as a chronological era, as a set of formal innovations in literary and aesthetic technique, and as a state in which the traditional social supports such as the family have eroded or disappeared, leaving individuals free to find their own way in society. This unmooring of the traditional family creates new opportunities for the exploration of identity.  Required Texts:  Caryl Churchill’s Top Girls, Don DeLillo’s White Noise, Thomas Pynchon’s The Crying of Lot 49, Art Spiegelman’s  Maus, Colson Whitehead’s The Intuitionists, Jeanette Winterson’s Written on the Body.  Films:  Ridley Scott’s  Blade Runner, Wachowski Brothers’ The Matrix, David Fincher’s Fight Club, and Christopher Nolan’s Memento. Course Requirements: Bi-weekly response on LEARN, 5 in-class quizzes, one final research paper (or take home final), and one in-class research presentation with accompanying annotated bibliography. 

487.001: The Poetics of Imagination

W 4:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
N. Scott Momaday, natachee@unm.edu

This course will offer a study of the way(s) in which imagination informs literature and serves to inspire and accomplish creativity.  

510.001: Criticism & Theory

W 4:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. 
Kathryn Wichelns, wichelns@unm.edu

In this course, we will engage in an intensive overview of significant movements in literary theory and criticism, with a focus on twentieth-century and contemporary thought. We begin with a review of foundational texts from earlier eras, representing some of the intellectual history that informs later developments: specifically, we will trace the ongoing influences of Kant, Wollstonecraft, Hegel, Marx, Freud, and Du Bois. These discursive origins remain central to contemporary examinations of language, aesthetics, race and racialization, sex and gender, and the role of literature in producing cultural meaning. We then will explore together the necessary ways that these first examinations are complicated over the course of the 20th Century. A mid-semester tour through clusters of ideas representative of Marxist literary analysis, psychoanalytic criticism, feminist theory, postcolonial studies, and critical race theory will enable us to begin recognizing the dimensions of our own contemporary period in our recent predecessors. Their inquiries frame constellations that continue to shift in our time: queer of color critique, border studies, postcolonial Marxisms, and performance studies, among other recent approaches, gain dimension and clarity when we understand their long histories. 

511.001: French Cinema Aesthetics and Politics

T 4:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.  
Raji Vallury, rvallury@unm.edu

The course offers a survey of French cinema from the silent era up to the 21st century, focusing on the historical and political events that shaped twentieth-century France. The Dreyfus Affair, the First and Second World Wars and the Occupation, the Algerian War of Independence, and the Revolution of May 68 constitute the key signposts along our historical enquiry into modern France. The cinematic representation of these landmark events will allow us to explore the themes of war, colonialism, ideology, revolution, nation and citizenship, torture and human rights, historical consciousness and memory. The question of gender will be inscribed in filigree through the course. A history of twentieth-century France will accompany our analysis of these events and themes. The relationship between aesthetic style and political content forms a core component of the syllabus. The course does not presuppose any knowledge of French cinema and the technique of filmic analysis. Students will be introduced to the study of film style and the vocabulary of cinematic technique. Key texts by filmmakers, critics, and theoreticians will enable us to understand cinema as a unique art form with distinct modes of constructing arguments about democracy, equality, justice, and the political community. The goal of this course is to move us towards an awareness of what is specifically modern about the cinematic experience, the power of the image, and its capacity to transform our perception of the real. Throughout, we will reflect on the political power of cinema, understood as an aesthetic education that reshapes the world of our senses, reconfiguring both our sensibility to the material and our ways of making sense of it: in short, cinema as a mode of inventing a meaningful life of and in the common. Films and filmmakers include: Abel Gance, J’accuse; Carl Dreyer, La passion de Jeanne d’Arc; Jean Renoir, La vie est à nous and La règle du jeu; Alain Resnais, Nuit et brouillard; Robert Bresson, Le dernier jour d’un condamné and Pickpocket; Marcel Ophuls, Le chagrin et la pitié; Jean-Luc Godard, Le petit soldat and La chinoise; Gillo Pontecorvo, La bataille d’Alger; Jacques Panijel, Octobre à Paris; Chris Marker, La jetée and Le joli mai; and Michael Haneke, Caché. Theorists include André Bazin, Pier Pasolini, Robert Bresson, Gilles Deleuze, Roland Barthes, and Jacques Rancière. With each filmmaker and thinker, we will consider how the cinematic image reinvents or recomposes the concept of fiction: understood in the Platonic sense of an illusory order of images opposed to the real essence of things and beings, the Aristotelian sense of a rationally ordered arrangement of actions, the psychoanalytical sense of an imaginary structure of desire, the Deleuzian sense of a machinic assemblage or a plane of composition of affects and percepts, or as what Jacques Rancière has described as a dispositif, a regime of visibility that reorders an hierarchical distribution of bodies and their capacities within a sphere of the perceptible.

Films will be screened in French, with English subtitles. Class readings, discussions and presentations will be in English. Texts by French theorists and critics may be read in the original French. Students taking the class for French credit may write their final research paper in French.

511.002: German Aesthetics and Theories of Play

M 4:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.  
Jason Wilby, jwilby@unm.edu

One exciting development over the past few decades in the areas of philosophy and critical theory has been the development of theories of play. What role does play serve in the establishment and development of human individuality? In what ways do literature and other aesthetic experiences contribute to the development of individuality through play? This course will consider these (and other) questions by first focusing on the development of theories of play in eighteenth and nineteenth century German philosophical and aesthetic writings. Modern day theories of play emerged as a result of the aesthetic and philosophical discussions in the German cultural sphere during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. During the second part of the course we will build on our historical foundation by considering these more recent developments in play theory, specifically in the areas of critical theory, psychology, and sociology. During the entire course, we will focus equally on understanding the philosophical and theoretical texts in their historical and intellectual contexts and then applying those models to a selection of literary texts that play with the theoretical positions in interesting ways.

515.001: Publishing

T 7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. 
David Dunaway, dunaway@unm.edu

This course in creative nonfiction introduces students to the publishing industry, in the U.S. and internationally, from the multiple perspectives of the author, the editor, the agent, and the publisher. Our primary goal is to provide a successful strategy for publishing your work in journals, magazines, books, and on the internet. Our secondary goal is to prepare an informed community of writers, able to understand contracts, industry procedures, and publishing’s cultural significance.

The class begins with a survey of current trends, then moves to a history of publishing in the U.S.; followed by an overview of ownership and control in the modern era. We discuss procedures and standards for submissions of articles and book proposals to publishers of literary, scholarly, technical, and trade (general-adult) materials. We examine in detail the roles of editors and agents in manuscripts—with an emphasis on the increasing digitization (e-books) and globalization of publishing/media activities. Any writer interested in these topics is welcome to join us. There are no exams. 

517.001: Editing

MWF 1:00 p.m. - 1:50 p.m.  
Stephen Benz, sbenz@unm.edu

This course focuses on editing as a professional skill. Along with practicing advanced copyediting skills, you will learn about "information design": the creation of documents that are complete, accurate, correct, comprehensible, usable, and appropriate for readers. Because editors must often be responsible for a document from its inception to its presentation as a finished product, you will also learn about layout and document design, developmental editing, and contemporary production processes. Successful completion of this course will provide you with the foundation necessary for a future career in the field.

520.002: Stylistics Analysis

TR 8:00 a.m. - 9:15 a.m. 
Jerome Shea, jshea@unm.edu

Stylistic Analysis is a wide ranging course that tries to find out what makes for good prose (and what makes for wretched prose). We will study periodic and running sentences, noun style and verb style, parataxis and hypotaxis. We will ponder such questions as "What do we mean by 'voice'?"; "What assumptions do we bring to prose that we don't bring to poetry?"; and "What do we mean by 'high style' and 'low style'?" We will question whether prose is transparent or opaque, and what the ramifications of that are. Five or six short papers, no exams.

521.001: Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction

M 4:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. 
Lori Ostlund, loriostlund@gmail.com

In order to write well, one must read constantly, observe the world well, and take seriously the craft of writing. For me, writing often comes down to two big questions: 1. How do we both inform and /move/ our reader? 2. How do we keep our reader engaged (locally, at the level of the word, the sentence, and the paragraph) while working toward the big picture: what the story is about? We will attend to these questions throughout the semester as we read the work of first others and then one another, and you will be asked to think about them as you write and, in particular, as you revise.

521.080: Creative Writing Workshop: Fiction

-Arranged
Luci Tapahonso, tapahons@unm.edu

522.080: Creative Writing Wokshop: Poetry

-Arranged
Luci Tapahonso, tapahons@unm.edu

523.001: Graduate Creative Nonfiction Workshop

T 4:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.  
Greg Martin, gmartin@unm.edu

This is a writing workshop focused on revision.  Each student will write two new pieces of creative nonfiction.  We will workshop each piece twice.  Then, each of you will choose one of these two essays to revise again, and you will submit this at the end of the semester to six literary magazines. The goal of the course is to push you to produce more than you thought you could, to break down what Jane Smiley calls “evasion strategies”. The particular sub-genre of creative nonfiction you may turn in to the workshop is wide open:  Autobiographical Narrative (an essay that has the dramatic structure of a short story); a Lyric Meditation (a more “classic” Montaigne-like essay that is structured meditatively or philosophically or associatively); Profile; Travel Writing; Literary Journalism; a hybrid essay that combines two or more of these forms. It's all fair game.  Readings for discussion in class will consist of (1) published essays from a variety of the sub-genres above, as well as (2) essays on craft. In selecting pieces for us to read and discuss, my aim is for eclecticism--to give you a sense of the range of literary nonfiction, to give you a sense of the possibilities of the form. My hope is that the course will push you stylistically and technically, and encourage you to take risks, to raise your standards for what you consider good writing, and then to meet those standards through the development of the habit of art.

538.001: Composition Studies/Writing Theory for Teachers

M 4:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.  
Todd Ruecker, truecker@unm.edu

Although a relatively young discipline, composition studies has a rich history with many areas of inquiry that influence the work we do as writers and teachers of writing. In this course, we will explore these many areas by going to the research directly: reading and discussing articles published in various composition journals over the last several decades. We will explore theories of audience, genre, process, collaboration, second language writing, multimodal composition, among others. By the end of the course, students should emerge with a broad understanding of various theories circulating in composition and have the understanding necessary to pursue further work in a particular area. Class work will include weekly readings (typically 4-5 articles) and responses, a synthesis of work on a particular topic, and a final paper exploring a particular theory in depth.

540.002: Seminar in Academic Writing in Education and Related Fields

W 4:15 p.m. - 6:45 p.m.  
Pisarn B Chamcharatsri, bee@unm.edu

Academic writing is a living organism in which the format can be changed based on the organizations and contexts it is in. For students to be successful in academia and beyond, they must develop metacognitive awareness in composing papers. This seminar aims to build student’s academic writing awareness through analytical lens of genre theory. In order to gain expertise in academic writing, one must be equipped with different rhetorical devices, formal knowledge, contextual background, and experiences.  We will discuss issues in writing for publications, (before) dissertation writing, writing for academic purposes, and writing for specific purposes. The aim of this course is to help students develop genre awareness and appropriate pedagogy in the teaching of writing in the future.  

541.001: English Grammars

MWF 11:00 a.m. – 11:50 a.m.
Beth Davila, bdavila@unm.edu  

Studying grammar doesn‘t have to be boring! This course helps students approach the study of grammar from different perspectives, all while attending to language politics, language attitudes, and language use. Projects include analyzing parts of speech, phrases, and constituents by representing sentences in phrase trees and sentence diagrams, considering language in use as well as the rules that govern our use, and examining our own and others’ academic writing using corpus linguistics.

543.001: Contemporary Texts in Rhetoric

R 4:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Joseph Bartolotta, jbartolotta@unm.edu

Contemporary Texts in Rhetoric will survey the study of Rhetoric from Nietzsche through today. While the course will feature "main ingredients" like Kenneth Burke, Habermas, Foucault, Lyotard, and Toulmin, there will also be several "deep cuts" from I.A. Richards, Richard Weaver, Bruno Latour, Victor Villanueva, and Chuck Bazerman. The course will also survey texts related to areas of contemporary rhetoric exploring Feminism, Sexuality, Race, (dis)Ability, Chicano/a, and First Nations approaches to rhetoric. We will also examine some of the freshest theories out today, such as the Rhetoric and Materiality, Ambient Rhetoric, and Rhetorical Ontologies.  By the end of this course, you will have exposure to many threads in contemporary rhetoric, and you will be able to pursue one or more of these topics that interests you most and develop a better understanding of its theoretical constructs.

548.001: Beowulf & Other Topics

TR 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.  
Jonathan Davis-Secord, jwds@unm.edu

Beowulf is the most celebrated and studied Old English poem, yet it remains ambiguous and contested. Modern scholars continue to scrutinize difficult points in the text and wrestle over approaches to the poem. This course will be devoted to a close reading of Beowulf in the original Old English, coupled with pertinent scholarship on specific points in the poem along the way. We will explore the roles of women in the text, the meanings of the monsters, the patterns of gift-giving, the linguistic intricacies of the text, and many other topics. Students will prepare translations of the poem, read secondary literature, and write a critical research paper for the semester. Prerequisite: ENGL 447/547 or the equivalent.

551.001: Medieval Latin

TR 9:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Jonathan Davis-Secord, jwds@unm.edu

The phrase medieval Latin covers an amazingly wide array of time periods, genres, and geographical locations. It applies to philosophical treatises written in Italy in the fifth century, letters written in northern Europe in the ninth century, and saints’ lives written in England in the fifteenth century. As a result of this abundance, this course will touch upon only a small number of important texts and authors from the medieval period. We will concentrate on short sections of these texts, spending several weeks with each in order for students to become familiar with major texts and authors of Medieval Latin and increase their facility with Latin generally and their knowledge of the distinguishing features of Medieval Latin specifically. Prerequisite: LATN 102 or equivalent.

551.002: Medieval Research and Bibliography

W 4:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.
Timothy C. Graham, tgraham@unm.edu

This course will offer intensive training in the research and bibliographic skills necessary for the study of the Middle Ages while also introducing students to the history of medieval scholarship from the sixteenth century onwards. A key aspect of the course will be a detailed orientation to the major published resources available to medievalists, including the volumes of the Patrologia Latina, the Monumenta Germaniae Historica, and the Early English Text Society, as well as the important series Early English Manuscripts in Facsimile. Participants in the course will learn about the techniques used by scholarly editors when preparing a medieval text for use by a modern readership; they will also be introduced to the conventions of the modern apparatus criticus. Students will learn how to read and analyze charters and other types of medieval documents and will receive instruction in the basics of such important ancillary disciplines as medieval chronology and sigillography. The section of the course devoted to the history of medieval scholarship will include a special focus on the origins and development of Anglo-Saxon studies from the sixteenth to the eighteenth century.

557.001: Fragmentation: Dickens, the Guillotine, and Film

TR 12:30 p.m. - 1:45 p.m.  
Gail Houston, ghouston@unm.edu

A metonym for the French Revolution (FR), the guillotine caused a cut in history reflected in the later creation of film. Fragmentation is at the heart of filmmaking (editing) and the FR (physical and mental fragmentation of consciousness and self). Dickens intuits these cuts aesthetically and theoretically by illustrating identity, history, and consciousness as fragmented. First used in 1792, the guillotine and the horrific and heroic events it signified were central to magic lantern shows and phantasmagorias that preceded and led to filmmaking. Scholarship has made the connection between representations of the French Revolution and the guillotine in the new popular entertainments of the magic lantern, panorama, and phantasmagorias, all of which used developing scientific principles on optics (Sophie Thomas). Scholarship has also noted Dickens’s aesthetic filmic qualities (writing that is similar to the screenplay form and parallel storytelling) (Grahame Smith, Sergei Eisenstein, D. W. Griffith). No scholarship has linked the magic lantern, the fragmented optics these produce, and the fragmented subjectivity created by the French Revolution with Dickens’ tendency to use the imagery of cut heads and fragmented, schizophrenic selves in his novels, in particular in Tale of Two Cities. By bringing these seemingly disparate historical, aesthetic, political threads together, I demonstrate that the new democratic understanding of individual identity as autonomous, agentic, and free (as opposed to the hierarchical trajectory of monarchy that only recognized the individual identity of the king) is ironically based on the cutting of the head from the body. I further demonstrate that this subjectivity was necessary and inherent to the development of the new artistic and industrial medium of film. We will examine phantasmagorias, magic lanterns, and the basics of film production, optics and fragmentation. We will also read Thomas Carlyle's The French Revolution upon which Tale of Two Cities is based and other Dickens novels and film versions to explore the fragmentation so central to nineteenth century British culture.

564.001: 20th Century Indigenous Literature

TR 2:00 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.  
Kathleen Washburn, washburn@unm.edu

In this course, we will investigate Native American and First Nations poetry, nonfiction, and fiction from the early twentieth century alongside contemporary novels and films that invoke the so-called assimilation era. We will encounter Native soldiers from World War I, students from Indian boarding schools, allotment agents, and characters from Hollywood westerns in texts that chart the creative possibilities and critical stakes for representing modern indigenous communities. In turn, by tracing the ways in which discourses about sovereign territory and citizenship rights from the early twentieth century continue to inflect Native American literature and film today, we will engage in debates about literary adaptation and innovation, indigenous intellectual history, and the ethics and aesthetics of cultural production. Course materials will include E. Pauline Johnson’s Tekahionwake, Laura Cornelius Kellogg’s Our Democracy, Gerald Vizenor’s Blue Ravens, Louise Erdrich’s Tracks, and Thomas King’s Green Grass, Running Water

580.001: Metaphysical Poets

TR 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.
Yulia Ryzhik, yryzhik@unm.edu

This course is primarily devoted to four major lyric poets of the late sixteenth and seventeenth centuries: Donne, Jonson, Herbert, and Marvell. In addition to reading the best works of these authors, we will discuss the evolving notions of what it meant to write poetry at this turbulent time, in a cultural milieu that was as rich in literary achievement as it was intellectually and politically volatile. As scientific and intellectual upheavals of the sixteenth century called into doubt ancient and medieval beliefs about the workings of the body, the world, and the universe, poets had to contend with the loss of a familiar metaphysical order. This loss undermined a fundamental belief in the truth of figurative language, leading at the same time to a crisis of imagination and to a newfound creative freedom. We will consider the ways in which these four authors construct a new metaphysics, working out systems of values and structures of belief through their poetry. Recurring topics of discussion will include emerging theories of poetic creativity, the influences of early modern science and philosophy, and the changing role of religion. This course is geared towards scholarly professionalization, and will include training in various forms of academic writing and performance, from conference abstract and presentation to article-length research paper.

640.001: Teaching Diverse Writing Students

W 4:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.  
Cristyn Elder, celder@unm.edu

This seminar explores major concepts in the teaching of writing to students from diverse language backgrounds and contexts. While the main theories, research, and practices under examination will be grounded in second language (L2) or multilingual writing, we will also explore aspects of related fields, including (bi-)literacy/(bi)-dialectal development and basic writing. Readings and discussions will cover topics such as understanding diverse student populations; first and second-language acquisition; writing program administration; program, course, and assignment design; student placement; feedback strategies; and assessment. For the major writing assignments, you will have the opportunity to apply the topics covered in class to your current (or future) teaching and research contexts, including that of composition, creative writing, literature, and beyond. These assignments may take many forms, dependent on your interests and goals, including program research, course development, an exploratory or pilot study, a book review for publication, an article for publication, a detailed research proposal, among others.

650.002: Romantic Poetry & Poetics

T 4:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Gary Harrison, garyh@unm.edu

This seminar will offer an intensive engagement Romantic poetry and poetics, with some discussion of European philosophical and aesthetic theory that impacted poetic form, poetics, and aesthetic theory in Britain, Europe and the Americas. The course will challenge the stereotype that the poetics and poetry of writers in the French Revolutionary period suddenly embarked upon a radical new project to overturn eighteenth-century precedents. In addition, the seminar will consider the influence of nineteenth-century poetry and poetics on 20th-century and contemporary poets and critics. Our initial focus will be upon the poetry and prose of William Blake, William Wordsworth, Charlotte Smith, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Keats, and Percy Bysshe Shelley. Depending upon the interests of the seminar participants we can move out synchronically to examine further the poetics of European and American romanticism—or we can move diachronically to later nineteenth-century, modernist, and/or contemporary poetry and poetics; alternatively, we can decide to focus intensively upon one or two of the writers mentioned above. In addition to pertinent twentieth-century and contemporary critics of romanticism, we will discuss essays by poets such as Matthew Arnold, T.S. Eliot, W.H. Auden, Seamus Heaney, and others who acknowledged, sometimes by negation, their relationship to Romantic poetry and poetics.

660.001: Nineteenth-Century American Gothic

M 4:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.  
Jesse Aleman, jman@unm.edu

This seminar focuses on the emergence of the American gothic in nineteenth-century literature and culture. The course begins with Charles Brockden Brown’s Wieland, a tale about religious fanatics, ventriloquism, and spontaneous combustion, and concludes with Henry James’ghost-story thriller, The Turn of the Screw. In-between, we’ll read short stories by Washington Irving, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Melville, Louisa May Alcott, Kate Chopin, Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Charles Chesnutt, to name a few, and we’ll study several examples of the gothic in American culture, including art and architecture; the rise of the asylum and cultures of the dead; pseudo-science and slavery. The readings will balance literary and cultural studies with theories of the fantastic, the grotesque, the uncanny, and the supernatural to understand how the American gothic emerges out the nation’s racial fears, sexual codes, class anxieties, religious history, and westward expansion; at the same time, we’ll pay keen attention to the literary forms the gothic struggles to take, including early forms of the novel, first-person fictional autobiographies, the short story, and the novella. The seminar is meant to interest all graduate students. The course requires one field-specific final project. For example, MA students could craft an essay for their portfolio; MFA students could write a piece on the emergence of a specific gothic form, genre, or style, as it might relate to the readings and their own writing; doctoral students can produce a conference paper or submit an essay for publication that connects the American gothic to their own field of study (British gothic; visual rhetoric of the gothic; contemporary reconfigurations of the gothic; etc).

680.001: The Gawain-Poet

R 4:00 p.m. – 7:30 p.m.  
Anita Obermeier, aobermei@unm.edu

The last quarter of the turbulent fourteenth century exhibited a highly imaginative and fertile period of heterogeneous literary composition. Although Geoffrey Chaucer is often called the Father of English Poetry and the uncontested literary giant of the fourteenth century, he does have to share the stage with several highly gifted authors, most notably the Gawain-Poet. This graduate seminar will offer the opportunity to study in depth and from a variety of perspectives the four poems of the late-fourteenth-century manuscript Cotton Nero A.x attributed to the Gawain-Poet: Pearl, “Cleanness”, “Patience”, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. We will also explore the historical and cultural context, including jewelry, armor, the Wilton Diptych, the tomb of Richard II, and the Alliterative Revival, within which this manuscript was created.